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Assume the following table/data:

person_id  age  gender  name
1          25   Female  Jane
2          28   Male    John
3          29   Female  Jill
4          24   Male    Jack

How do I query for the oldest Male and Female?

This is not working: SELECT person_id, max(age), gender, name FROM person GROUP BY gender

as it returns:

person_id  age  gender  name
2          28   Male    John
1          29   Female  Jane

The desired result is:

person_id  age  gender  name
2          28   Male    John
3          29   Female  Jill

What's wrong with my SQL?

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Group by gender will take the first name of that gender, and get the max age out of the same table, not combining the results –  Rene Pot Oct 4 '11 at 22:30
    
Topener, how should I query this? –  StackOverflowNewbie Oct 4 '11 at 22:36
    
Take a look at answers below, i think unbutbu is giving you a good example in a minute –  Rene Pot Oct 4 '11 at 22:43
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can get all the data of a row combining ORDER BY and LIMIT 1. In your case, using this twice and combining with UNION:

  ( SELECT * 
    FROM person 
    WHERE gender = 'Male'
    ORDER BY age DESC
    LIMIT 1
  )
UNION ALL
  ( SELECT * 
    FROM person 
    WHERE gender = 'Female'
    ORDER BY age DESC
    LIMIT 1
  )

Another way is to fing the maximum age of males and females (with subqueries):

SELECT *
FROM person
WHERE ( gender = 'Male'
      AND age =  
          ( SELECT MAX(age) 
            FROM person 
            WHERE gender = 'Male'
          )
      )
   OR ( gender = 'Female'
      AND age =  
          ( SELECT MAX(age) 
            FROM person 
            WHERE gender = 'Female'
          )
      )

If you have more than 2 genders or if you prefer not to hardcode Male and Female constants in the query, this can be rewritten as:

SELECT p.*
FROM person AS p
  JOIN
      ( SELECT gender
             , MAX(age) AS maxage 
        FROM person 
        GROUP BY gender
      ) AS pg
    ON  pg.gender = p.gender
    AND pg.maxage = p.age

The above queries have a main difference. The 1st will give you only one male and only one female result (at most). The 2nd and 3rd query will give you more than one when there are many (males) with same maximum age and similarly for females.

An index on (gender, age) will help either query.

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The last example you showed - JOINing with a derived table - is the way I would typically expect to see this done. The other approaches you outlined would work, but would not be my first choice. –  Lee Oct 4 '11 at 23:28
    
Yes, I use 3 over 2, too. Query 1 has different result-set and can be altered to a more general one (like the 2->3 change) if one wants that result-set (only one row per group). –  ypercube Oct 4 '11 at 23:32
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When you GROUP BY gender, you can not control which value from each group is chosen for nonaggregated columns (age is aggregated, but name is not):

From the docs:

MySQL extends the use of GROUP BY so that the select list can refer to
nonaggregated columns not named in the GROUP BY clause.... The server is free
to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values
chosen are indeterminate.

It is possible, however, to get the desired result with a subselect:

SELECT p1.*
FROM person p1
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT gender,MAX(age) as age
    FROM person 
    GROUP BY gender) as p2
ON p1.gender = p2.gender AND p1.age = p2.age
share|improve this answer
    
unutbu, any suggestions to get the data I need? –  StackOverflowNewbie Oct 4 '11 at 22:37
    
By the way, the example I gave is a simplified version of my problem. The real problem is that I have a certain entity in my database that makes log entries. I need to find the very last log entry for that entity. I have a timestamp column in the table. –  StackOverflowNewbie Oct 4 '11 at 22:48
    
The query you've shown here is extremely inefficient. The database will have to execute the sub-select (with an implicit grouping) once for each row in person, even though the final query will return only a few rows. A much better approach (with the same results) is the 3rd query shown in @ypercube's answer. –  Lee Oct 5 '11 at 0:52
    
@Lee: Thanks for the warning; you are correct. –  unutbu Oct 5 '11 at 2:35
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You need to add ORDER BY age DESC before since the grouping will take the first element to pass-by.

(I think that you could even replace max(age) by age with that)

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Manhim, can you please give me the complete query? Just add that to the end? It's not working for me. And I don't see why I need to ORDER BY anything. I just want the oldest male and female. I don't particularly care what the order is of the results. –  StackOverflowNewbie Oct 4 '11 at 22:31
    
SELECT * FROM person ORDER BY age DESC GROUP BY gender might need to switch GROUP and ORDER, I don't remember. –  Manhim Oct 4 '11 at 22:32
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You said in a comment:

By the way, the example I gave is a simplified version of my problem. The real
problem is that I have a certain entity in my database that makes log entries. I
need to find the very last log entry for that entity. I have a timestamp column
in the table

Try the following, should work in the table I imagine you have... however providing the table structure would help and it could be solved with a group by too :)

select * from log_table
where log_date_time = (select max(log_date_time) from log_table)
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