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I would like to create a function in OCaml that returns a map of how often each character occurs in a file. For example, consider a file containing this:

AAAAA BB C

That input would produce this map:

{ ' ' -> 2, 'A' -> 5, 'B' -> 2, 'C' -> 1 }

Here's what I have so far:

let usage = "usage: " ^ Sys.argv.(0) ^ " [OPTION]... [FILE]..."
let file = ref ""
let speclist = [
  ("-z", Arg.String (fun c -> file := c), " compress [FILE]");
  ("-d", Arg.String (fun d -> file := d), " decompress [FILE]");
]

let build_freq_map f =
  let channel = open_in f in
  function x ->
    input_byte channel

let () =
  Arg.parse
    speclist
    (fun x -> raise (Arg.Bad ("Bad argument: " ^ x)))
    usage;

  build_freq_map !file;

But this doesn't compile, saying:

File "main.ml", line 19, characters 1-22:
Error: This expression has type 'a -> int
       but an expression was expected of type unit

How would I modify my code so that build_frequency_map returns a map of a file's characters and frequencies?

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1 Answer

Your error is pretty simple and self-explanatory. build_freq_map !file has a function type (it returns a function). You are pattern matching that whole thing with () i.e. the unit type. So the types don't match.

It looks like your program is kinda incomplete, because it doesn't output anything or do anything with the result it gets from build_freq_map. Furthermore, I don't see any logic in build_freq_map that actually builds your "map" that you want. So you still have a ways to go.

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Yeah, working on the logic is the next step, once I get it to compile. It's definitely incomplete. How do I modify the code so that I'm not pattern matching against the unit type? (This is my first OCaml program.) –  rps Oct 5 '11 at 14:35
    
Nevermind, I figured it out. Thanks. –  rps Oct 5 '11 at 14:45
    
There is an implicit let () = before the call to build_freq_map !file. Since build_freq_map returns a function and not unit, that is the compilation error. To solve this, you need to probably handle that return. You can either bind a variable, or use an underscore (let _ = ) before the function call. –  nlucaroni Oct 5 '11 at 18:19
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