Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my implementation of the equals class for a Coor class which is just contains 2 ints x and y. would this be the proper way of implementing this method?

 public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj == null || obj.getClass() != this.getClass()) {
            return false;
        }
        Coor temp = (Coor) obj;
        if (temp.x == this.x && temp.y == this.y) {
            return true;
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
share|improve this question
2  
Yes. If all the fields are the same, and this is what you mean by "equals", then you've made the method correctly. This won't work if you're comparing something that inherits from the current (this) class, but it will work if they are. –  bdares Oct 5 '11 at 0:13
1  
don't forget to override the hashcode function should you wish to use it in Collections (even if behind the screens) –  ratchet freak Oct 5 '11 at 0:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could add one more check for reflexive equality (equal to self):

 public boolean equals(Object obj) {

    // Reflexive equality: did I get passed myself?
    if(this == obj){
        return true;
    }

    if (obj == null || obj.getClass() != this.getClass()) {
        return false;
    }

    Coor temp = (Coor) obj;
    return temp.x == this.x && temp.y == this.y;
}
share|improve this answer
    
could you explain what the "this==obj" is actually comparing?, is it just checking if it is the same object? –  user979490 Oct 5 '11 at 0:23
1  
Memory location of the objects. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 5 '11 at 0:24
1  
It's checking the 2 object references (this and obj) to see if they point to the same memory location. If they do, they are the same object. –  Pat Oct 5 '11 at 0:31
    
Although it doesn't hurt, this does add weight to your code with--well probably absolutely no benefit at all after the system is through optimizing it (Google premature optimization for reasons). –  Bill K Oct 5 '11 at 21:26

Yes, it would.

Also be sure to override your hashCode() method--never override one without doing the other as well, it will confuse the hell out of your collections.

Your case could use a hash where it simply shifts one of the ints 32 bits and adds it to the other creating a completely unique long (a perfect hash function in this case--no collisions)

share|improve this answer
    
i'm going to have to read up on that becuase i have no idea what haseCode() is or what it does, but thanks for the suggestion –  user979490 Oct 5 '11 at 0:25

Seems ok. For brevity sake, you can do:

return temp.x == this.x && temp.y == this.y

Instead of

if (temp.x == this.x && temp.y == this.y) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }

Also, please keep in mind the Object Contract (seriously!).

See the accepted answer here: Overriding equals and hashCode in Java

This can save you a huge about of headache in the future.

share|improve this answer

Check this out:

http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=17

If that article is too much detail, then the short of it is: Your implementation is correct, but you should keep some other things in mind:

  1. You will also have to implement hashCode.

  2. equals will no longer commpare the object's identity. Doesn't sound like that's a problem for you.

  3. You could add the @Override annotation to your equals method.

share|improve this answer

Here’s a more straightforward way:

public boolean equals(Object other) {
    return other instanceof Coor
      && ((Coor) other).x == x
      && ((Coor) other).y == y
}
share|improve this answer

I believe this would work, at a quick glance. I say this because:

  1. It handles a null/improper types well.
  2. Performing x.equals(y) would yield the same result as y.equals(x).
  3. Performing x.equals(x) would return true.
  4. Performing x.equals(y) == true and y.equals(z) == true implies that x.equals(z) == true

This question has certainly been asked many times before though. See here: Overriding equals and hashCode in Java. A book called Effective Java discusses this topic in great detail too, and the particular chapter is linked off of there.

share|improve this answer

There's only one source to read for how to override equals and hashCode: chapter 3 of Joshua Bloch's "Effective Java".

If you have a good IDE, like IntelliJ, it'll generate equals and hashCode the right way for you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.