Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Input

datas2 = [[("01/01/2011", 1), ("02/02/2011", "No"), ("03/03/2011", 11)],
[("01/01/2011", 2), ("03/03/2011", 22), ("22/22/2222", "no")],
[("01/01/2011", 3), ("03/03/2011", 33), ("22/22/2222", "333")]]

Intended Output

[("01/01/2011", 1, 2, 3), ("03/03/2011", 11, 22, 33)]

[Update]

I was asked about real data and more examples (messy codes in history):

A                       B                       C
09.05.2011;1.561        12.04.2011;14.59        12.04.2011;1.5
10.05.2011;1.572        13.04.2011;14.50        13.04.2011;1.5    
11.05.2011;1.603        14.04.2011;14.56        14.04.2011;1.5    
12.05.2011;1.566        15.04.2011;14.54        15.04.2011;1.5    
13.05.2011;1.563        18.04.2011;14.54        18.04.2011;1.5    
16.05.2011;1.537        19.04.2011;14.52        19.04.2011;1.5    
17.05.2011;1.528        20.04.2011;14.53        20.04.2011;1.5    
18.05.2011;1.543        21.04.2011;14.59        21.04.2011;1.5    
19.05.2011;1.537        26.04.2011;14.65        26.04.2011;1.6    
20.05.2011;1.502        27.04.2011;14.68        27.04.2011;1.6    
23.05.2011;1.503        28.04.2011;14.66        28.04.2011;1.6    
24.05.2011;1.483        29.04.2011;14.62        29.04.2011;1.6    
25.05.2011;1.457        02.05.2011;14.65        02.05.2011;1.6    
26.05.2011;1.491        03.05.2011;14.63        03.05.2011;1.6    
27.05.2011;1.509        04.05.2011;14.54        04.05.2011;1.5    
30.05.2011;1.496        05.05.2011;14.57        05.05.2011;1.5    
31.05.2011;1.503        06.05.2011;14.57        06.05.2011;1.5    
01.06.2011;1.509        09.05.2011;14.61        09.05.2011;1.6    
03.06.2011;1.412        10.05.2011;14.66        10.05.2011;1.6    
06.06.2011;1.380        11.05.2011;14.71        11.05.2011;1.7    
07.06.2011;1.379        12.05.2011;14.71        12.05.2011;1.7    
08.06.2011;1.372        13.05.2011;14.70        13.05.2011;1.7    
09.06.2011;1.366        16.05.2011;14.75        16.05.2011;1.7    
10.06.2011;1.405        17.05.2011;14.69        17.05.2011;1.6    
13.06.2011;1.400        18.05.2011;14.65        18.05.2011;1.6    
14.06.2011;1.414        19.05.2011;14.69        19.05.2011;1.6 
  • If I unpacked A and B, it would contain all values.
  • If I unpacked A, B and C, it would contain:

    [ ["09.05.2011", 1.561, 14.61, 1.6], ["10.05.2011", 1.572, 14.66, 1.6], ["11.05.2011", 1.603, 14.71, 1.7], ["12.05.2011", 1.566, 14.71, 1.7], ["13.05.2011", 1.563, 14.70, 1.7], ["16.05.2011", 1.537, 14.75, 1.7], ["17.05.2011", 1.528, 14.69, 1.6], ["18.05.2011", 1.543, 14.65, 1.6], ["19.05.2011", 1.537, 14.69, 1.6] ]

so every date must have as much values as there are files i.e. columns A, B, C,...

share|improve this question
    
It must validate dates? –  JBernardo Oct 5 '11 at 2:24
    
@JBernardo: not in this case, I just want to get the tuple unpacking working. Validation would be another question. –  hhh Oct 5 '11 at 2:26
    
Ok, so let me see if I have this right. You want, for each date that is found in every list, a tuple consisting of (a) the date, and (b) the associated values from each tuple in each list? –  Karl Knechtel Oct 5 '11 at 3:57
    
@KarlKnechtel: I want only those values that have a value corresponding to every data. So if one value is not in one set, it will not be inculed. –  hhh Oct 5 '11 at 4:11
    
@KarlKnechtel: what I was not that far off from the answers, just a few lines: final_result = list(result.items()) newResults = defaultdict(list) for (date, vals) in final_result: if len(vals) == size: newResults[date].append(vals) print newResults so this case is solved, still investigating the shorter way of doing this... –  hhh Oct 5 '11 at 4:35
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
from collections import defaultdict
import itertools

d = defaultdict(list)
for i,j in itertools.chain.from_iterable(datas2):
    if not isinstance(j, str):
        d[i].append(j)

and d will be a dict like:

{'01/01/2011': [1, 2, 3], '03/03/2011': [11, 22, 33]}

So you can format it later as tuples with d.items()

Note the "22/22/2222" wasn't validated, but is quite easy to do that inside the for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
His example data set included '333' and his output didn't include that, so I figured he just wanted to screen out anything that wasn't a number. –  steveha Oct 5 '11 at 2:39
    
@steveha Yeah, now I noticed it... The question should be more specific... –  JBernardo Oct 5 '11 at 2:40
    
+1 for using "Pythonic" iterator machinery –  Peter Oct 5 '11 at 2:51
    
@steveha I assumed he wanted to screen out every date that isn't common to each data-set. Question is incredibly under-specified. –  Karl Knechtel Oct 5 '11 at 3:58
    
but is dict poor choice because it is not ordered? It is slow to go through it with large data... –  hhh Oct 5 '11 at 4:55
show 1 more comment

This code is written to work equally well on Python 2.x or Python 3.x. I tested it with Python 2.7 and Python 3.2.

from collections import defaultdict

datas2 = [
    [("01/01/2011", 1), ("02/02/2011", "No"), ("03/03/2011", 11)],
    [("01/01/2011", 2), ("03/03/2011", 22), ("22/22/2222", "no")],
    [("01/01/2011", 3), ("03/03/2011", 33), ("22/22/2222", "333")]
]


def want_value(val):
    """return true if val is a value we want to keep"""
    try:
        # detect numbers by trying to add to 0
        0 + val
        # no exception means it is a number and we want it
        return True
    except TypeError:
        # exception means it is the wrong type (a string or whatever)
        return False

result = defaultdict(list)

for lst in datas2:
    for date, val in lst:
        if want_value(val):
            result[date].append(val)

final_result = list(result.items())
print(final_result)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't like how you validate the 'no' parameter... –  JBernardo Oct 5 '11 at 2:39
    
Well, usually when I want to make something work with numbers, I just force the value to a number with int(val) or float(val). In this case, he had an example string of '333' and he didn't want that included. I think it is generally considered Pythonic to use exceptions to sort wheat from chaff like this, and generally considered a bit icky to check types with isinstance(). This function will screen out 'no'', 'No', '333', None, object instances, and anything else that might show up in there, while passing anything that acts like a number. What would you recommend I do? –  steveha Oct 5 '11 at 2:44
    
That's why I don't like it... You're blocking everything and it may be hard to debug later. But it's just my opinion –  JBernardo Oct 5 '11 at 2:46
    
@JBernando At least he split the validation out into a separate method, which is good practice - for example it makes it trivial for you to change the validation logic to reject only 'No', 'no', 'nO', and 'NoWay!' if you decide that's what you want, and to not use Exceptions, if they offend you. Note that the original question gives no guidance as to what values should be legal or illegal, and how illegal values should be handled. –  Peter Oct 5 '11 at 2:47
    
I don't think OP works with so many formats! The question should have more explanation and real data. BTW, I like exceptions (a lot), but it doesn't feel right for me to use them like that –  JBernardo Oct 5 '11 at 2:49
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.