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If there were two <ul>'s, one called list_a and the other called list_b, using javascript and not using any libraries like jQuery, how would you delete the <li>'s in list_a that have the same value as those in list_b?

Heres the example HTML:

  <ul id="list_a">
    <li value="1">list_a_0</li>
    <li value="8">list_a_8</li>
    <li value="9">list_a_9</li>
  </ul>

  <ul id="list_b">
    <li value="8">list_b_8</li>
    <li value="9">list_b_9</li>
    <li value="2">list_b_2</li>
  </ul>

The end result should be:

  <ul id="list_a">
    <li value="1">list_a_0</li>
    <!-- DELETED TWO <li>'s -->
  </ul>

  <ul id="list_b">
    <li value="8">list_b_8</li>
    <li value="9">list_b_9</li>
    <li value="2">list_b_2</li>
  </ul>

The javascript so far that I can build (that doesn't work) is:

window.onload=function()
{
  init();

  function init()
  {
    var listA = document.getElementById("list_a");

    for(var i in listA.childNodes)
    {
      var x = listA.childNodes[i];
      var listB = document.getElementById("list_b");

      for(var j in listB.childNodes)
      {
        var y = listB.childNodes[j];
        if(x.innerHTML == y.innerHTML)
          listA.removeChild(listA);
      }
    }          
  }  
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
listA.removeChild(listA); should be listA.removeChild(x); I believe. Looks like that should be enough. Although... .innerHTML will never be the same, because the content of the list items differ. Try comparing their .value in stead, see if that suits your needs. –  Decent Dabbler Oct 5 '11 at 2:27
    
I'm curious about the use-case for this. It can be done, but your problem clearly lies elsewhere (why are you having to fix this in JS)! –  jman Oct 5 '11 at 2:27
    
Don't use innerhtml, use textnode and it's value. Also, just keep a hash of encountered values, if the value exists already then remove that node and move onto the next one. –  Incognito Oct 5 '11 at 2:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/rmXrZ/

window.onload = function() {

    var listA = document.getElementById("list_a");
    var listB = document.getElementById("list_b");

    for (var i = 0; i < listA.children.length; i++) {
        var x = listA.children[i];

        for (var j = 0; j < listB.children.length; j++) {
            var y = listB.children[j];
            if (x.value == y.value) {
                listA.removeChild(x);
                i--;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • Don't use for-in for iteration of numeric indices

  • Cache the DOM selection instead of re-selecting in the loop

  • Use .children instead of .childNodes to avoid text nodes between elements

  • Compare .value instead of .innerHTML

  • Remove x instead of listA

  • When an element is removed from listA, decrement i, because removal from the DOM means removal from the .children collection.

share|improve this answer
  function init() {
    var listA = document.getElementById("list_a");
    var listB = document.getElementById("list_b");

    for(var i =0; i<listA.children.length;i++) {
      var x = listA.children[i];

      for(var j in listB.children) {      
        var y = listB.children[j];
        if(x.value == y.value)
           x.parentNode.removeChild(x);
      }
    }          
  }  

Avoid hitting the DOM on multiple occasions, also in this case children is a better choice of data.

share|improve this answer

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