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I'm trying to use an AES cipher to encrypt some bytes but it's returning a silent error, meaning I enter something like:

byte[] raw = new String("Test","UTF8").getBytes("UTF8");

and it won't return anything. I think the problem is the ByteArrayInput/OutputStreams but I don't know how to do it any other way..

Here's the code in question.

public byte[] encrypt(byte[] in) {
    byte[] encrypted = null;
    try {
        aesCipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aeskeySpec);
        ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(in);
        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(bais.available());
        CipherOutputStream os = new CipherOutputStream(baos, aesCipher);
        copy(bais, os);
        os.flush();
        byte[] raw = baos.toByteArray();
        os.close();
        encrypted = Base64.encodeBase64(raw);

    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (InvalidKeyException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (NoSuchPaddingException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
    return encrypted;
}

Here's another function in the same class that does work:

public void encrypt(File in, File out) {


    try {
        aesCipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        aesCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, aeskeySpec);
        FileInputStream is;
        is = new FileInputStream(in);
        CipherOutputStream os = new CipherOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(out), aesCipher);
        copy(is, os);
        os.close();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (InvalidKeyException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    } catch (NoSuchPaddingException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(FileEncryption.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }

}

private void copy(InputStream is, OutputStream os) throws IOException {
    int i;
    byte[] b = new byte[2048];
    while ((i = is.read(b)) != -1) {
        os.write(b, 0, i);
    }
}
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1  
since you're logging exception, what's in your log file? –  stivlo Oct 5 '11 at 3:06

1 Answer 1

The first thing that catches my eye is this line:

aesCipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");

Assuming aesCipher is a variable of type Cipher, you are calling here the static Cipher.getInstance and throwing away the result (not assigning it to any variable). I.e. this line has no effect at all, aesCipher is the same as before this line.

If it was null before, then it still is null, and the next line (which calls a non-static method) will give you a NullPointerException. If your code is silently gobbling unknown exceptions (this might be outside the code shown), this is a general problem.

Other than this, I suppose that the flush on the CipherOutputStream does not really flush the whole buffer, but only as many blocks that can be written without adding any padding. Use close() instead of flush() here (which also seems to work in the second example).


A general remark: A small self-contained complete compilable example would have enabled me to try it and give you a definite answer, instead of only guessing. For example, "does not return anything" is not a good description for the behavior of your method - does the method return null, an empty array, throw an exception, block eternally?

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