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What is the clearcase Command to find all view private files in the current directory recursively?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The usual commands are based on cleartool ls:

  • ct lsprivate: but it is only for dynamic views, not snapshot views
  • ct ls -rec -view_only: at least, it works in both snapshot and dynamic views

However both list also your checked-out files.

If you want only the private files, ie skipping the hijacked/eclipsed/checked-out and symlinks, you need to filter those out.

In Windows, that would be:

for /F "usebackq delims=" %i in (`cleartool ls  -rec ^| find /V "Rule:" ^| find /V "hijacked" ^| find /V "eclipsed" ^| find /V "-->"`) do @echo "%i"

In Unix:

cleartool ls -rec | grep -v "Rule:" | grep -v "hijacked" | grep -v "eclipsed" | grep -v "-->" | xargs echo
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In case it helps anyone else reading this question here is VonC's windows solution with a couple of minor changes to run as a windows script:

@echo off
setlocal
for /F "usebackq delims=" %%A in (`cleartool ls  -rec ^| find /V "Rule:" ^| find /V "hijacked" ^| find /V "eclipsed" ^| find /V "-->"`) do @echo "%%A"

Replace @echo with rmdir /S /Q and del /F to do the actual deletions as described here. So the final script is:

@echo off
setlocal
for /F "usebackq delims=" %%A in (`cleartool ls  -rec ^| find /V "Rule:" ^| find /V "hijacked" ^| find /V "eclipsed" ^| find /V "-->"`) do rmdir /S /Q "%%A"
for /F "usebackq delims=" %%A in (`cleartool ls  -rec ^| find /V "Rule:" ^| find /V "hijacked" ^| find /V "eclipsed" ^| find /V "-->"`) do del /F "%%A"

If you save as a .bat file under the element of the view you are cleaning from, the script will clean up by deleting itself as well :-)

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1  
Looks good, more accurate than my answer for Windows. +1 –  VonC Nov 27 '13 at 6:28

I amended the version by @MilesHampson since this returned too many results for me and, I want to run this as a batch file.

My new files won't be in the debug or obj folder and as such, I don't need to see any results for those folders... I'm also only working on C#. So that's all I need to see.

@echo off
setlocal

@echo Searching, please wait as this can take a while...

for /F "usebackq delims=" %%A in (`cleartool ls  -rec ^| find /V "Rule:" ^| find /V "hijacked" ^| find /V "eclipsed" ^| find /V "-->" ^| find /V "obj" ^| find /V "debug"`) do  ( 
  if "%%~xA"==".cs" echo %%A
  )
)

@echo === === === === === Search Complete === === === === === === 

pause

Create a bat file with the above, drop it into your root project folder and run it. It will display those not in source control.

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In case it helps anyone else reading this question, here is VonC's Unix solution with a couple of minor changes to run under Cygwin on Windows.

In Cygwin:

cleartool ls -rec | grep -v "Rule:" | grep -v "hijacked" | grep -v "eclipsed" | grep -v -- "-->" 

The Cygwin line is similar to the Unix given by VonC, but note the double-dash on the last grep is needed (and the xargs is not needed).

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ct lsprivate -other 

Would also filter out checked-out files

ct lsprivate -co : list all checked-out files

ct lsprivate -do : list all derived object files

ct lsprivate -other : list all other private files

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only works in dynamic view though –  x29a Mar 19 at 11:53

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