Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

because power(base, exponent) has no return value unless exponent is 0, initially, shouldn't power(base, exponent -1) return 'undefined', and therefore be unmultipliable, initially? So, I am having trouble following the logic of this code. Why/how does it work?

function power(base, exponent) {
  if (exponent == 0)
    return 1;
  else
    return base * power(base, exponent - 1);
}
share|improve this question
    
Um, it returns values in both cases from the if. Can't really see what you're having a problem with. –  Tom Oct 5 '11 at 6:07
3  
power(13, 5) = 13*(13*(13*(13*(13*power(13, 0))))). The final value is calculated only after the last power() call. The function calculates power(13, 0) which is 1, then 13*1, then 13*(13)... –  e-MEE Oct 5 '11 at 6:17
    
Oh. You should submit that. That makes sense. –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:52
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It could be more concise:

function power(base, exponent) {
  return exponent == 0? 1 : base * power(base, --exponent);
}

Howerver an iterative solution is very much faster:

function powerNR(base, exp) {
  var result = 1;
  while(exp--) {
    result *= base;
  }
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Does : mean else and ? mean 'if it does, return the following'? –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:44
    
The section in the chapter's on recursion, though. Hmm... –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:48
    
Is it faster because there's less code on the back end? –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:59
1  
The ternary operator is: (test)? <if true return this> : <if false return this> and is equivalent to: if(test){do something}else{do something else}. –  RobG Oct 5 '11 at 7:00
1  
The iterative function is faster because it's only one function call, a recursive function has multiple calls (to itself). Function calls are relatively expensive, avoid them when you can. Recursive functions can be very concise, but that's not necessarily a good reason to use them. They are often difficult to read and slow (but look really cool when you want to do a lot with a little code). –  RobG Oct 5 '11 at 7:04
show 1 more comment

Look at what happens if you try to calculate 5^3:

power(5, 3)  ... this should give us 125, let's see if it does...

function power(base, exponent) {    // base = 5, exponent = 3
  if (exponent == 0)                // nope, exponent != 0
    return 1;
  else
    return base * power(base, exponent - 1);  // return 5 * power(5, 2)
}

... what is power(5, 2) ? ...

function power(base, exponent) {    // base = 5, exponent = 2
  if (exponent == 0)                // nope, exponent != 0
    return 1;
  else
    return base * power(base, exponent - 1);  // return 5 * power(5, 1)
}

... what is power(5, 1) ? ...

function power(base, exponent) {    // base = 5, exponent = 1
  if (exponent == 0)                // nope, exponent != 0
    return 1;
  else
    return base * power(base, exponent - 1);  // return 5 * power(5, 0)
}

... what is power(5, 0) ? ...

function power(base, exponent) {    // base = 5, exponent = 0
  if (exponent == 0)                // yup, exponent != 0
    return 1;                       // return 1
  else
    return base * power(base, exponent - 1);
}

... putting that together, in reverse order as we walk back up the stack...

power(5, 0) = returns 1
power(5, 1) = 5 * power(5, 0) = 5 * 1 =  returns 5
power(5, 2) = 5 * power(5, 1) = 5 * 5 =  returns 25
power(5, 3) = 5 * power(5, 2) = 5 * 25 =  returns 125

... so, power(5, 3) returns 125, as it should.
share|improve this answer
    
Oh. That's what I was thinking, but it was just a hunch. It's much more beautiful when it's written out like this. Thank you. Can I ask what causes it to walk back up, though? –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:42
    
If there's no return value until it hits 0, then it has to go from 0 back up to 3 and receive returns each time, right? Or are there return values on the way down to 0 that add up, which we can list and just 'walk through'? Sorry for the confusion, but I don't really know if 'walk' means the program is running the numbers, or if it means that people can look at them because they exist. Is it a technical term or something? –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:51
    
Ah, I see. Because it's undefined, it's just multiplying 13*undefined*13 (which turns out as 13*13), and then finally multiplying the result by 1 and ending the program because of the return. So, walking through means mentally, I guess. Cool. –  千里ちゃん Oct 5 '11 at 6:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.