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the more I learn bash the more questions I have, and the more I understand why very few people do bash. Easy is something else, but I like it.

I have managed to figure out how to test directories and there writablity, but have a problem the minute I try to do this with a remote server over ssh. The first instance testing the /tmp directory works fine, but when the second part is called, I get line 0: [: missing]'`

Now if I replace the \" with a single quote, it works, but I thought that single quotes turn of variable referencing ?? Can someone explain this to me please ? Assuming that the tmp directory does exist and is writable, here the script so far

#!/bin/bash
SshHost="hostname"
SshRsa="~/.ssh/id_rsa"
SshUser="user"
SshPort="22"
Base="/tmp"
Sub="one space/another space"

BaseBashExist="bash -c \"[ -d \"$Base\" ] && echo 0 && exit 0 || echo 1 && exit 1\""
SSHBaseExist=$( ssh -l $SshUser -i $SshRsa -p $SshPort $SshHost ${BaseBashExist} )
echo -n $Base
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
    then
        echo -n "...OK..."
    else
        echo "...FAIL"
        exit 1
fi
BaseBashPerm="bash -c \"[ -w \"$Base\" ] && echo 0 && exit 0 || echo 1 && exit 1\""
SSHBaseExist=$( ssh -l $SshUser -i $SshRsa -p $SshPort $SshHost ${BaseBashPerm} )
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
    then
        echo "...writeable"
    else
        echo "...not writeable"
fi

BaseAndSub="$Base/$Sub"
BaseAndSubBashExist="bash -c \"[ -d \"$BaseAndSub\" ] && echo 0 && exit 0 || echo 1 && exit 1\""
SSHBaseAndSubExist=$( ssh -l $SshUser -i $SshRsa -p $SshPort $SshHost ${BaseAndSubBashExist} )
echo -n $BaseAndSub
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
    then
        echo -n "...OK..."
    else
        echo "...FAIL"
        exit 1
fi
BaseAndSubBashPerm="bash -c \"[ -w \"$BaseAndSub\" ] && echo 0 && exit 0 || echo 1 && exit 1\""
SSHBaseAndSubPerm=$(  ssh -l $SshUser -i $SshRsa -p $SshPort $SshHost ${BaseAndSubBashPerm} )
if [ $? -eq 0 ]
    then
        echo -n "...writeable"
    else
        echo "...not writeable"
fi
exit 0
share|improve this question
    
What do you mean "very few people do it"? Granted, few people do it really well, but that's another topic altogether. –  tripleee Oct 5 '11 at 12:52
    
No offence intended, just that in the 15 years of development I have really only a hand full of people that actually know bash... –  Willem P. Botha Oct 5 '11 at 13:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are fine with single quotes in this context; by the time the script is seen by the remote bash, your local bash has already substituted in the variables you want to substitute.

However, your script is a total mess. You should put the repetitive code in functions if you cannot drastically simplify it.

#!/bin/bash

remote () {
    # most of the parameters here are at their default values;
    # why do you feel you need to specify them?
    #ssh -l "user" -i ~/.ssh/id_rsa -p 22 hostname "$@"
    ssh hostname "$@"
    # —---------^
    # if you really actually need to wrap the remote
    # commands in bash -c "..." then add that here
}

exists_and_writable () {
    echo -n "$1"

    if remote test -d "$1"; then
        echo -n "...OK..."
    else
        echo "...FAIL"
        exit 1
    fi

    if remote test -w "$1"; then
        echo "...writeable"
    else
        echo "...not writeable"
    fi
}

Base="/tmp"
# Note the need for additional quoting here
Sub="one\\ space/another\\ space"

exists_and_writable "$Base"

BaseAndSub="$Base/$Sub"

exist_and_writable "$BaseAndSub"

exit 0
share|improve this answer
    
adding a function for the files tests saves almost 35% of code and it still is simple. –  Willem P. Botha Oct 5 '11 at 12:59
    
Note also how the exit code from ssh is the exit code from the remote command. The whole && echo 0 || echo 1 thing you had was superfluous. –  tripleee Oct 5 '11 at 14:19
    
the reason for the echo was so that I have a local variable to test after the fact. This would allow me to do a global test after preforming multiple directory test.. if that makes any sense, but with your approache this local variable testing is unnecessary –  Willem P. Botha Oct 6 '11 at 7:19

The first thing you should do is refactor your code with simplicity in mind, then the quoting error will go away as well. Try:

if ssh [flags] test -w "'$file'"; then

Encapsulate your SSH flags in a ssh config to facilitate re-use, and your script will shorten dramatically.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and ditto for the remote bash -c "command" invocations. There might be situations where you genuinely need to run Bash instead of your regular login shell on the remote host, but I strongly speculate that this is not one of those cases. –  tripleee Oct 5 '11 at 8:08
    
encapsulating the flags and simply double quoting the $file does save about 20% of code and greatly simplifies the structure... Thanks for the input. Can I assume then that single quotes inside double quotes does not prevent variable referencing, contrary to what the documentation says.. ? –  Willem P. Botha Oct 5 '11 at 12:35
    
Try echo "foo '$HOME'" and think about it for a while. The single quotes are not special inside double quotes. –  tripleee Oct 5 '11 at 14:17

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