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I am trying to write a function

row :: Int -> Int -> [Int]
row n v

that returns a list of n integers, all 0's, except for the vth element, which needs to be a 1.

For instance,

row 0 0 = []
row 5 1 = [1,0,0,0,0]
row 5 3 = [0,0,1,0,0]

I am new to Haskell and having a lot of difficulty with this. In particular I can't figure out how to make it repeat 0's. I understand the concept of building a list from let's say [1..n], but I just get [1,2,3,4,5]

Any help with this would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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Thank you everyone! –  Shabu Oct 5 '11 at 8:40
2  
Hi Shabu. If you feel your question has been answered, please select one of the answers as the accepted answer. That way, others can quickly find a solution that works for your problem, without going through all answers. You select an answer by clicking the check mark to the left of the question. –  Boris Oct 5 '11 at 10:05
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8 Answers 8

Try:

let row n v = map (\x -> if x == v then 1 else 0) [1..n]
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+1 for cleverness –  pelotom Oct 5 '11 at 8:22
4  
Even shorter: row n v = map (fromEnum.(== v)) [1..n] –  Landei Oct 5 '11 at 9:42
3  
+1 for the kronecker delta - a snippet worth noting –  epsilonhalbe Oct 5 '11 at 10:06
2  
@Landei: shorter, but obfuscates the meaning a bit. –  Dan Burton Oct 5 '11 at 14:16
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Here a "monadic" solution:

row n v = [(v-1, 0), (1, 1), (n-v, 0)] >>= (uncurry replicate)

The replicate function repeats a given value a number of times, e.g. replicate (v-1) 0 gives a list of v-1 zeros. The uncurry is used to modify the replicate in order to accept a tuple instead of two single arguments. The funny operator >>= is the heart of a monad; for lists it is the same as concatMap with flipped arguments.

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This is perhaps the best solution, as it's extremely easy to generalize. –  leftaroundabout Oct 5 '11 at 9:41
    
+1, very very clever. –  missingfaktor Oct 5 '11 at 12:10
    
Probably the cleverest indeed, but not necessarilly the easiest to read –  mb14 Oct 7 '11 at 9:42
    
I just started out with a solution like the one from Ankur, but the repetition of replicate bugged me. –  Landei Oct 7 '11 at 13:20
    
This "solution" gives [1] for row 0 0 where it should evaluate to []. –  Chris Oct 7 '11 at 18:00
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With a comprehensive list :

 row n v = [if x == v then 1 else 0 | x <- [1..n]]

Or using fromEnum (thanks dave4420)

 row n v = [fromEnum (x == v) | x <- [1..n]]
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That shortest way is fromEnum. –  dave4420 Oct 5 '11 at 9:01
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This should also work:

row n v = replicate (v-1)­ 0 ++ [1] ++ repl­icate (n-v)­ 0
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And yet another solution, recursively building up the list:

row :: Int -> Int -> [Int]
row 0 _ = []
row n 1 = 1 : (row (n-1) 0)
row n m = 0 : (row (n-1) (m-1))

And a more readable one, where zeros are "taken":

row :: Int -> Int -> [Int]
row 0 _ = []
row n m = take (m - 1) zeros ++ [1] ++ take (n - m) zeros
    where zeros = (iterate id 0)
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the fun with haskell is that it let's you write your program very much the way you would express the algorithm. So try:

row n v = [if (x `mod` v==0) then 1 else 0  | x <- [1..n] ]

At first you create a list from 1,2 to n. Then you check if the number is divisible by v, if it is, 1 is inserted in the output list, if not 0.

Examples:

> row 0 0
[]
> row 5 1
[1,0,0,0,0]
> row 5 3
[0,0,1,0,0]
> row 15 3
[0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1]

HTH Chris

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A simple recursive loop with two temporary variables c and lst . c is for counting and lst is list which we have to return.

row :: Int -> Int -> [ Int ]
row 0 0 = []
row n v = rowHelp n v 1 [] where
    rowHelp n v c lst
            | c > n = lst
            | v == c = rowHelp n v ( c + 1 ) ( lst ++ [ 1 ] )
            | otherwise = rowHelp n v ( c + 1 ) ( lst ++ [ 0 ] )

~
~

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I like to demonstrate a top down approach, based on Chris's solution:

row n v = result           
    where
        result = take n numbers        -- our result will have a length of n
        numbers = map trans [1,2,..]   -- and is some transformation of
                                       -- the list of natural numbers
        trans e
           | e `mod` v == 0  = 1       -- let every v-th element be 1
           | otherwise       = 0       -- 0 otherwise

This style emphasizes the idea in functional programming that one writes down what a certain value like row n v is supposed to be, rather than trying to write down what a function does. In reminiscence of a well known joke about the lesser known pragramming language Sartre one could say that in pure functional programming functions do nothing, they just are.

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create an infinite list, and taking the beginning of it seems a bit procedural for me. You write 2 statements , which both do something (computing the infinite list and then take the beginning). This is not at all (IMO) writing how things are supposed to be, but more how to do it, which is what you say which should not do . map trans [1..n] seems easies to read, isn't it ? –  mb14 Oct 5 '11 at 10:31
1  
I am sorry you don't like it and I did not say it's the most efficient or shortest source code way. –  Ingo Oct 5 '11 at 15:23
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