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I encountered what seemed to me as strange behavior using glUniformMatrix4x3fv. Specifically when I give TRUE as for the transpose flag entire rows of my matrices are missing in my shader variable (and those that are there are therefor out of order).

For example. Say I have in my GLSL shader:

mat4x3 T[m];

Then in my C++ OpenGL call I want to send a matrix whose entries are (stored in row-major order):

T = 
  1 2 3
  4 5 6
  7 8 9 
  10 11 12
  101 102 103
  104 105 106
  107 108 109
  110 111 112
  101 102 103
  204 205 206
  207 208 209
  210 211 212
  ...

And I call

glUniformMatrix4x3fv(location,m,false,T);

Then I see in my shader that the each matrix comes out correctly as:

T[0] -> 
    1   4    7   10
    2   5    8   11
    3   6    9   12
T[1] -> 
  101 104  107  110
  102 105  108  111
  103 106  109  112
  ...

BUT, if I store my matrix on the C++ side as (again row-major order):

T = 
    1   4    7   10
    2   5    8   11
    3   6    9   12
  101 104  107  110
  102 105  108  111
  103 106  109  112
  201 204  207  210
  202 205  208  211
  203 206  209  212
  ...

And try to use the transpose flag as TRUE with:

glUniformMatrix4x3fv(location,m,true,T);

Then in my shader the matrices show up incorrectly as:

T[0] -> 
    1   4    7   10
    2   5    8   11
    3   6    9   12
T[1] -> 
  102 105  108  111
  103 106  109  112
  201 204  207  210
T[2] -> 
  203 206  209  212
  301 304  307  310
  302 305  308  311
  ... 

Every 4th row of my data is missing.

Is there a sensible reason for this? I find nothing in the spec (s2.1 p82).

GL_VERSION: 2.1 NVIDIA-1.6.36 GL_SHADING_LANGUAGE_VERSION: 1.20

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T and T[i] represent arrays or they are a graphical representation of the matrices? –  Luca Oct 6 '11 at 21:05
    
They are just graphical representations of the matrices. –  mangledorf Oct 7 '11 at 5:25

1 Answer 1

Then in my C++ OpenGL call I want to send a matrix whose entries are (stored in row-major order):

That's not row-major order. That's column-major order.

Given the following 4x3 matrix:

1  4  7  10
2  5  8  11
3  6  9  12

This is what a C++ array of this data in column-major order would look like:

{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12}

That's what your data is. Feel free to insert space wherever you want; it's entirely irrelevant.

This is what the same data in row-major order looks like:

{1, 4, 7, 10, 2, 5, 8, 11, 3, 6, 9, 12}

As to the specific issue you encountered with transposing your data for 4x3 matrices, it may simply be a driver bug.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean "That's not row-major order. That's column-major order." The data of my first C++ matrix above for row-major order: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ...}; and for my second matrix just as you write: {1, 4, 7, 10, 2, 5, 8, 11, 3, 6, 9, 12, ...} –  mangledorf Oct 5 '11 at 8:47
    
@mangledorf: I meant exactly what I said: your data is in column-major order. Column-major order means that the first X values in the array are the values for the first column, where X is the number of rows in the matrix. The columns are all contiguously laid out, hence the term "column major". –  Nicol Bolas Oct 5 '11 at 9:02
    
But how can you tell me how my data is ordered. I'm making the specific point of telling you that it is row-major order. If I just wrote the entries of the matrix alone there would be no one of knowing if it was column- or row-major ordered. –  mangledorf Oct 5 '11 at 9:06
    
@mangledorf: Everything you've posted about your code and the behavior of your application says that your data is column major. The only contradictory information is your insistence that it isn't column major. So either what you've posted about your code is misleading or you are mistaken about the ordering of your data. This isn't a hard thing to verify. Given a matrix on the CPU stored as an array of floats, what are the indices that store the translation component of the transform? If your answer is 9, 10, and 11, it's column major. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 5 '11 at 9:12
    
No, I think you're mistaken. Maybe you are confused because GLSL is storing the data column-major. If my first matrix T which is size m*4 by 3 (on the C++ side) was column-major then the T[9],T[10],T[11] would be 204,207,210. If it is row-major order like I keep saying then T[9],T[10],T[11] are indeed 10,11,12. If the second matrix T (on the C++ side) was column-major then T[9],T[10],T[11] would be 301,302,302. It is row-major order like I keep saying then T[9],T[10],T[11] are 6,9,12. For this second matrix the translation component is (using row-major order) at T[3],T[7],T[11] values 10,11,12 –  mangledorf Oct 5 '11 at 9:40

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