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I was trying to setup the domain controller feature which is new in JBoss AS7. When the servers and the host controller are running from the same folder of JBoss then the domain controller starts up on running the domain.bat.But if I have some servers which need to run on some other physical machine, then how will the domain controller start those servers when the domain controller comes up. As host.xml knows the address to the controller but the domain does not know the different host controllers in different machines. Does it mean that the host controllers in different machines needs to be started before the domain controller? If yes how?

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1 Answer 1

The process is an interesting one that has been documented well by the JBoss community per the following links.

https://docs.jboss.org/author/display/AS7/Admin+Guide#AdminGuide-ManagedDomain

https://docs.jboss.org/author/display/AS7/Domain+Setup

In summary, when you boot the domain script, the Host Controller becomes active. The role of this controller is to simply manage the server instances attributed to it. One of the Hosts will be configured to act as the Domain Controller, which is indicated by a simple element in the host.xml file.

<domain-controller>
   <local/>
</domain-controller>

Under this same file are two sections that the Host acting as Domain Controller will need to configure, which as you can imagine are the interface and ports for the other Hosts to communicate to.

<management-interfaces>
   <native-interface interface="management" port="9999" />
   <http-interface interface="management" port="9990" />
</management-interfaces>

<interfaces>
   <interface name="management">
       <inet-address value="192.168.0.12"/>
   </interface>
</interfaces>

This has set up the Domain Controller so resolves the port declarations of the native interface (which it needs to communicate) and the http interface (including the Management Console) to the relative inteface "management". The interface declaration in turn resolves this to the IP address 192.168.0.12. The job of the Domain Controller will be to manage the other Host Controllers. But they need to know how to resolve themselves.

To do this we need a few things. We need a name for the Host Controller to call itself to differentiate from the others, and we need to expose an interface to the Domain Controller, as well as know the interface that the Domain Controller is exposing itself. These are all still done in the respective host.xml files for the each installation (which you can script in the CLI if your savvy).

Here's the unique name:

<host xmlns="urn:jboss:domain:1.0"
     name="staging">
[...]
</host>

Here's the slave host declaring ports to a relative name, and what that relative name resolves to:

<management-interfaces>
   <native-interface interface="management" port="9999" />
</management-interfaces>


<interfaces>
   <interface name="management">
       <inet-address value="192.168.0.101"/>
   </interface>
</interfaces>

And here's where we tell the Host Controller where to find the Domain Controller. This is so it can register itself, which should go some way to answering your question of how the Domain Controller "knows" what Hosts are available.

<domain-controller>
   <remote host="192.168.0.12" port="9999"/>

So in summary... each instance of the host has a unique name, knows where to tap the head honcho on the shoulder, and what interface to expose to it. In return, the head honcho is exposing a management interface itself, where it listens for instances to push around (including their name, their interface and server groups).

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