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I'm currently looking to add some debug only code to a windows phone project. This debug code will drag in some debug class library references (nunit helpers) and some WCF service client references, and I'd really like to not have these referenced in the release build.

Can anyone suggest any way that I can add an Assembly-Reference to debug, but not have it appear in release?

I've seen this on Connect - https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/106011/allow-adding-assembly-references-on-a-per-configuration-basis-debug-release - but it's marked as "postponed"

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Ooh, nice question. Is this possible with some MSBuild trickery, perhaps? –  Jeremy McGee Oct 5 '11 at 9:52
    
I think you might need to have two project files, unfortunately. –  Ray Oct 5 '11 at 9:58
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Both cases using MSBuild Condition, you've once configure csproj and forget about this.

First: Using Condition

  1. Create new project DebugOnlyHelpers
  2. Reference all Debug-specific helpers in this project
  3. Specify a Condition in csproj file where need to filter references:

<ProjectReference 
            Include="DebugOnlyHelpers.csproj"
            Condition=" '$(Configuration)' == 'DEBUG' "

Second: Using Condition together with Choose/When:

<Choose>
    <When Condition=" '$(Configuration)'=='DEBUG' ">
        <ItemGroup>
             <Reference Include="NUnit.dll" />
             <Reference Include="Standard.dll" />
         </ItemGroup>
    </When>
    <Otherwise>
         <ItemGroup>
             <Reference Include="Standard.dll" />
         </ItemGroup>
    </Otherwise>
</Choose>
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Thanks for this - +1 added - I'm testing and will hopefully be back to tick it soon :) –  Stuart Oct 5 '11 at 22:13
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Unfortunately there's no way to do this right now. You'll have to switch to debug and remove the reference, then add it back when you return to release.

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Of course there is. –  Ritch Melton Oct 5 '11 at 11:36
1  
I didn't know of the MSBuild solution, but there's certainly no clean way to do it in Visual Studio itself. –  Polynomial Oct 5 '11 at 12:06
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