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Is there a way to change the tables that logback writes its data to using the dbAppender, It has three default tables that must be created before using dbAppender, but I want to customise it to write to one table of my choosing. Something similar to Log4J where I can specify the SQL that gets executed when inserting the log to the database.

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possible duplicate of DBAppender - how to change default table names? – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 5 '11 at 10:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to implement ch.qos.logback.classic.db.names.DBNameResolver and use it in the configuration:

<appender name="DB" class="ch.qos.logback.classic.db.DBAppender">
  <dbNameResolver class="com.example.MyDBNameResolver"/>
  <!-- ... -->
</appender>
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Hi, Thanks for your answer, do you know where there are any examples of this implemented, I have implemented the DBNameresolver but im not sure what the methods take and what they return. – Magezy Oct 11 '11 at 11:24
    
By default this class takes an instance of ch.qos.logback.classic.db.names.ColumnName and returns the name of each enum value. Look at two available implementations in Logback distribution. Please file an issue to document this feature. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Oct 11 '11 at 11:37

Tomasz, maybe I'm missing something but I don't see how just using custom DBNameResolver could be the answer to what Magezy asked. DBNameResolver is used by DBAppender via SQLBuilder to construct 3 SQL insert querys - via DBNameResolve one can only affect names of tables and columns where data will be inserted, but can not limit inserting to just one table, not to mention that by just implementing DBNameResolver there are no means to control what actually gets inserted.

To match log4j's JDBCAppender IMO one has to extend logback's DBAppender, or DBAppenderBase, or maybe even implement completely new custom Appender.

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The easiest way for me was to make an appender from scratch. I'm appending to a single table, using Spring JDBC. It works something like this:

public class MyAppender extends AppenderBase<ILoggingEvent>
{
  private String _jndiLocation;
  private JDBCTemplate _jt;

  public void setJndiLocation(String jndiLocation)
  {
    _jndiLocation = jndiLocation;
  }

  @Override
  public void start()
  {
    super.start();

    if (_jndiLocation == null)
    {
      throw new IllegalStateException("Must have the JNDI location");
    }
    DataSource ds;
    Context ctx;
    try
    {
      ctx = new InitialContext();
      Object obj = ctx.lookup(_jndiLocation);
      ds= (DataSource) obj;

      if (ds == null)
      {
        throw new IllegalStateException("Failed to obtain data source");
      }
      _jt = new JDBCTemplate(ds);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      throw new IllegalStateException("Unable to obtain data source", ex);
    }

  }

  @Override
  protected void append(ILoggingEvent e)
  {
    // log to database here using my JDBCTemplate instance
  }
}

I ran into trouble with SLF4J - the substitute logger error described here: http://www.slf4j.org/codes.html#substituteLogger

This thread on multi-step configuration enabled me to work around that issue.

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<appender name="CUSTOM_DB_APPENDER" class="com.....MyDbAppender">
        <filter class="com......MyFilter"/>
        <param name="jndiLocation" value="java:/comp/env/jdbc/....MyPath"/> 
</appender>

And your java MyDbAppender should have a string jndiLocation with setter. Now do a jndi lookup (see the solution answered in Oct 17 '11 at 16:03)

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