Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to verify an X509 certificate using python. In particular I need to check CRLs when I do it.

Now, you can use m2crypto to do this, but I can't find an option corresponding to openssl's -crl_check or -crl_check_all.

Alternatively, I could use a pipe and call openssl directly:

p1 = Popen(["openssl", "verify", "-CApath", capath, "-crl_check_all"], 
           stdin = PIPE, stdout = PIPE, stderr = PIPE)

message, error = p1.communicate(certificate)
exit_code = p1.returncode

However, it seems that openssl verify always returns an exit code 0, so I would have to compare strings somehow to tell if the verification is successful, which I'd prefer not to do.

Am I missing something simple here?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How do I verify an SSL certificate in python? –  phihag Oct 5 '11 at 11:08
    
In his code, there's: '# Skip step 4 (no CRLs to add)'. So it doesn't cover the CRL part which I'm interested in. –  wrgrs Oct 5 '11 at 13:32
add comment

3 Answers 3

Looking at the source code of openssl's verify.c, it indeed returns 0 all the time, and there's no way to change that. However, you don't need to call openssl on the command line: there are python bindings for the library.

share|improve this answer
    
M2Crypto is one of the 'python bindings for OpenSSL' library… and last time I checked all of those libraries had problems (limited functionality) and M2Crypto seemed the best for me at that time. SSL/TLS support in Python sucks :-( And sometimes calling the openssl binary may be still the best choice. –  Jacek Konieczny Oct 5 '11 at 12:10
    
I just can't find the particular CRL functions in either pyopenssl or M2Crypto. I would be happy to be wrong on this. –  wrgrs Oct 5 '11 at 13:34
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, well what I've done is this:

p1 = Popen(["openssl", "verify", "-CApath", capath, "-crl_check_all"], 
           stdin = PIPE, stdout = PIPE, stderr = PIPE)

message, error = p1.communicate(certificate)

verified = ("OK" in message and not "error" in message)

It's not what I would have chosen. It has passed my tests, but I'm not certain that it will always work. I don't know C well enough to read the openssl source code and verify it.

If anyone can find a situation where this would fail, please comment.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I submitted a patch to M2Crypto that allows X509 certificate verification against a chain of CAs as well as multiple CRLs.

https://bugzilla.osafoundation.org/show_bug.cgi?id=12954#c2

See this post for more info: How do I use m2crypto to validate a X509 certificate chain in a non-SSL setting

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.