Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm marking up a series of knowledge base how-to type articles which have a series of steps and associated screenshots. In the past I have always wrapped text within a list item within paragraph tags but I'm wondering if this is semantically correct in this case or if I should be using a heading tag (or even nothing). I'm tempted to mark it up as follows:

<ol class="kbarticle">
        <li>
            <p>Download the Windows client software <a href="">here</a>.</p>
            <a href="#screenshot1"><img src="screen1.jpg" alt="Step 1" /></a>
        </li>
        <li>
            <p>Double click the downloaded file and click "Next" to continue.</p>
            <a href="#screenshot2"><img src="screen2.jpg" alt="Step 2" /></a>
        </li>
<ol>

Additionally, if there are any HTML5 elements which would be more semantically correct, I'd love to know.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here’s one way you could mark it up using <figure>:

<ol class="kbarticle">
  <li>
    <figure>
      <a href="#screenshot1"><img src="screen1.jpg" alt="Step 1"></a>
      <figcaption>
        Download the Windows client software <a href="">here</a>.
      </figcaption>
    </figure>
  </li>
  <li>
    <figure>
      <a href="#screenshot2"><img src="screen2.jpg" alt="Step 2"></a>
      <figcaption>
        Double click the downloaded file and click "Next" to continue.
      </figcaption>
    </figure>
  </li>
</ol>
share|improve this answer

I'd say that more often than not, the <p> tags are superfluous and the <li> tags alone are sufficient, but it's a fine call, and I don't think what you're doing is really harmful.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it's valid. LI is defined as

<!ELEMENT LI - O (%flow;)* -- list item -->

and %flow is defined as

<!ENTITY % flow "%block; | %inline;">

and %block naturally contains P, as it's a block level element.

share|improve this answer
4  
Heads-up: The question is on semantic correctness, not structural correctness. –  pinkgothic Oct 5 '11 at 11:51

According to this answer, li's can contain block or inline elements (from the HTML4 spec).

share|improve this answer
5  
Heads-up: The question is on semantic correctness, not structural correctness. –  pinkgothic Oct 5 '11 at 11:51

http://validator.w3.org/ does not complain about it when I validate in Strict mode. So I think that this layout should be fine.

share|improve this answer
9  
validator does not validate semantics though, just syntax and structure –  Gordon Oct 5 '11 at 11:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.