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import java.io.*;
class demo
{
public static void main(String args[])
{
    PrintWriter pw=new PrintWriter(System.out);
    pw.println("java");
    //pw.print("java");
}
}

// the output is java using pw.println but output is null using pw.print i.e nothing gets printed on console while using print.

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Are you sure this is not just your shell "hiding" it from you, since the program does not echo a newline? You could try piping the output to a file to check whether this happens. –  Marius Solbakken Mellum Oct 5 '11 at 13:24
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try this instead :

PrintWriter pw=new PrintWriter(System.out);
pw.print("java");
pw.flush();

The PrintWriter is going to be doing internal buffering, and the println method is automatically flushing it.

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but why the following code don't work: PrintWriter pw=new PrintWriter(System.out,true); pw.print("java"); –  shubhendu mahajan Oct 5 '11 at 13:29
    
If you look at the javadoc (download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/io/…) you'll see that "if automatic flushing is enabled it will be done only when one of the println() methods is invoked, rather than whenever a newline character happens to be output." So, the only way to make it do what you want it to do is to actually call flush() –  stevevls Oct 5 '11 at 13:38
    
ok thanx for help –  shubhendu mahajan Oct 5 '11 at 14:25
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It's almost certainly just buffering - and as you're not flushing it, you never get the output. From the docs:

Unlike the PrintStream class, if automatic flushing is enabled it will be done only when one of the println, printf, or format methods is invoked, rather than whenever a newline character happens to be output. These methods use the platform's own notion of line separator rather than the newline character.

Try:

pw.flush();

at the end of the code.

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For automatic flushing, you could use this constructor

PrintWriter(OutputStream out, boolean autoFlush);
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tried but didn't worked with pw.print("java") –  shubhendu mahajan Oct 5 '11 at 13:28
    
Did you put autoFlush to true? –  Mansuro Oct 5 '11 at 13:45
    
ya i tried this: PrintWriter pw=new PrintWriter(System.out,true); pw.print("java"); but no solutions –  shubhendu mahajan Oct 5 '11 at 14:23
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A call to println() implicitly flushes the output buffer whereas a call to print() does not. Try using print() and then call pw.flush().

Note also that there are constructors of PrintWriter which include an option to automatically flush after any write call.

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