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I am trying to describe date/time intervals and was wondering if there are any standards or sudo standards that would apply. Examples of the intervals would be Mon to Fri from 9:30 to 5:30 from June 5 to July 31. So from the example I want to be able to do a interval based on the year (June 5 to July 31) and inside that days of the week (Mon to Fri) and inside hours and mins of the day (9:30 to 5:30). I have looked the ISO 8601 standard and it talks about time intervals, but unless I am missing something it would not handle the days of the week issue very well. I have came up with the xml seen below to describe my example case. I just want to check if there is a standards before I continue creating on my own. Also if you don't know of a standard but have any ideas that would better my format I would welcome them.

<timeInterval name="something">
  <rule name="blah">
    <locale>:America/Chicago</locale>
    <dateRange start="06-05" end="07-31" />
    <timeRange start="9:30" end="17:30" />
    <days>1,2,3,4,5</days>
  </rule>
</timeInterval>

Thanks

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

For maximum conformance to standards (which will make it easier to process your data using XSD, XSLT, and XQuery), make the dateRange an xs:gMonthDay value (for example "--06-05"), make the timeRage an xs:time value (09:30:00), and use space as a separator in the value rather than comma (or use a nested element <day>). I agree there's not much you can do about days of the week. I think I would probably use Mon Tue Wed etc for clarity.

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