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What is the proper way to compare 2 times in Python in order to speed test a section of code? I tried reading the API docs. I'm not sure I understand the timedelta thing.

So far I have this code:

from datetime import datetime

tstart = datetime.now()
print t1

# code to speed test

tend = datetime.now()
print t2
# what am I missing?
# I'd like to print the time diff here
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5  
Why didn't you print t2-t1? What stopped you from subtracting? –  S.Lott Apr 20 '09 at 16:00
3  
Guess, I had the "it couldn't be that easy" moment. –  BuddyJoe Apr 20 '09 at 16:20

11 Answers 11

up vote 68 down vote accepted

datetime.timedelta is just the difference between two datetimes ... so it's like a period of time, in days / seconds / microseconds

>>> a = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> b = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> c = b - a

>>> c
datetime.timedelta(0, 4, 316543)
>>> c.days
0
>>> c.seconds
4
>>> c.microseconds
316543

Be aware that c.microseconds only returns the microseconds portion of the timedelta! For timing purposes always use c.total_seconds().

You can do all sorts of maths with datetime.timedelta, eg:

>>> c / 10
datetime.timedelta(0, 0, 431654)

It might be more useful to look at CPU time instead of wallclock time though ... that's operating system dependant though ... under Unix-like systems, check out the 'time' command.

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Anyone interested in getting total minutes can use int(c.total_seconds() / 60) in this case –  sufinawaz Feb 6 at 15:41
    
The page for the timeit module says that the module "avoids a number of common traps for measuring execution times." Is this approach (using datetime.now) subject to any of those pitfalls? –  kuzzooroo Feb 21 at 20:55

You might want to use the timeit module instead.

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1  
+1: Excellent module –  bortzmeyer Apr 20 '09 at 12:13
    
Cool. I'll check this out. +1 –  BuddyJoe Apr 20 '09 at 22:01

You could also use:

import time

start = time.clock()
do_something()
end = time.clock()
print "%.2gs" % (end-start)

Or you could use the python profilers.

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Since Python 2.7 there's the timedelta.total_seconds() method. So, to get the elapsed milliseconds:

>>> import datetime
>>> a = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> b = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> delta = b - a
>>> print delta
0:00:05.077263
>>> int(delta.total_seconds() * 1000) # milliseconds
5077
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You could simply print the difference:

print tend - tstart
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I am not a Python programmer, but I do know how to use Google and here's what I found: you use the "-" operator. To complete your code:

from datetime import datetime

tstart = datetime.now()

# code to speed test

tend = datetime.now()
print tend - tstart

Additionally, it looks like you can use the strftime() function to format the timespan calculation in order to render the time however makes you happy.

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see second comment at the question level. –  BuddyJoe Apr 20 '09 at 16:22
    
Best comment I've seen in ages. –  Chris Johnson Jun 8 '12 at 19:59
    
"but I do know how to use Google" -- apparently though, you don't know how to use Stack Overflow, because the whole purpose of this website is for people to ask and answer programming questions correctly and up to the point, not to give snark about how "you could have Goggled it instead". –  Nikos Ventouras 2 days ago

The following code should display the time detla...

from datetime import datetime

tstart = datetime.now()

# code to speed test

tend = datetime.now()
print tend - tstart
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time.time() / datetime is good for quick use, but is not always 100% precise. For that reason, I like to use one of the std lib profilers (especially hotshot) to find out what's what.

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You may want to look into the profile modules. You'll get a better read out of where your slowdowns are, and much of your work will be full-on automated.

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I know this is late, but I actually really like using:

start = time.time()

##### your timed code here ... #####

print "Process time: " + (time.time() - start)

time.time() gives you seconds since the epoch. Because this is a standardized time in seconds, you can simply subtract the start time from the end time to get the time in seconds the process took to complete. time.clock() is good for benchmarking, but I have found it kind of useless if you want to how long your process took. For example, it's much more intuitive to say "my process takes 10 seconds" than it is to say "my process takes 10 processor clock units"

>>> start = time.time(); sum([each**8.3 for each in range(1,100000)]) ; print (time.time() - start)
3.4001404476250935e+45
0.0637760162354
>>> start = time.clock(); sum([each**8.3 for each in range(1,100000)]) ; print (time.clock() - start)
3.4001404476250935e+45
0.05

In the first example above, you are shown a time of 0.05 for time.clock() vs 0.06377 for time.time()

>>> start = time.clock(); time.sleep(1) ; print "process time: " + (time.clock() - start)
process time: 0.0
>>> start = time.time(); time.sleep(1) ; print "process time: " + (time.time() - start)
process time: 1.00111794472

In the second example, somehow the processor time shows "0" even though the process slept for a second. time.time() correctly shows a little more than 1 second.

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You could use timeit like this to test a script named module.py

$ python -mtimeit -s 'import module'
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