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I'm using getopt (not getops) to provide the ability for my bash script to process options and switches (both long --option and short -o forms).

I'd like to be able to trap invalid options and handle them, typically echoing out that the user should try cmd --help and then exiting the script.

Thing is, the invalid options are being caught by getopt, which is itself outputting a message such as "getopt: invalid option -- 'x'"

Here's the pattern I'm using to set my getopt parameters:

set -- $(getopt -o $SHORT_OPTIONS -l $LONG_OPTIONS -- "$@")

where both $LONG_OPTIONS and $SHORT_OPTIONS are a comma-delimited list of options.

Here's how I handle processing the options:

 while [ $# -gt 0 ]
    do
        case "$1" in
            -h|--help)
                cat <<END_HELP_OUTPUT

    Help
    ----

    Usage: ./cmd.sh 

    END_HELP_OUTPUT

                shift;
                exit
                ;;
            --opt1)
                FLAG1=true
                shift
                ;;
            --opt2)
                FLAG2=true
                shift
                ;;
            --)
                shift
                break
                ;;
            *)
                echo "Option $1 is not a valid option."
                echo "Try './cmd.sh --help for more information."
                shift
                exit
                ;;
        esac
    done

getopt -q will suppress the output, but my trapping scheme within the case statement still fails to do what I expect. Instead, the program just executes, despite the invalid arguments.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This sort of style works for me:

params="$(getopt -o d:h -l diff:,help --name "$cmdname" -- "$@")"

if [ $? -ne 0 ]
then
    usage
fi

eval set -- "$params"
unset params

while true
do
    case $1 in
        -d|--diff)
            diff_exec=(${2-})
            shift 2
            ;;
        -h|--help)
            usage
            exit
            ;;
        --)
            shift
            break
            ;;
        *)
            usage
            ;;
    esac
done
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This is not the most robust solution, but it's reasonable; it relies on the following:

  • The error message that getopt prints is prefixed with "getopt: "
  • The assumption is that it's acceptable to pass through a cleaned-up version of getopt's error message, augmented with custom information.

Code snippet:

# Invoke getopt; suppress its stderr initially.
args=$(getopt -o $SHORT_OPTIONS -l $LONG_OPTIONS -- "$@" 2>/dev/null)
if [[ $? -ne 0 ]]; then # getopt reported failure
    # Rerun the same getopt command so we can capture stderr output *only* this time.
    # Inefficient (and a potential maintenance headache, if literals were involved), but this will only execute in case of invalid input.
    # Alternatively, redirect the first getopt invocation's stderr output to a temp. file and read it here.
    errmsg=$(getopt -o $SHORT_OPTIONS -l $LONG_OPTIONS -- "$@" 2>&1 1>&-)
    # Strip getopt's prefix and augment with custom information.
    echo -e "${errmsg#getopt: }\nTry './cmd.sh --help for more information." 1>&2
    exit 1
fi
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Could work, eh? Like you said, pretty fragile. –  Tom Auger Jun 6 '12 at 20:51
    
@TomAuger: If you think that "pretty fragile" adequately paraphrases "not the most robust, but it's reasonable", you must be running an incompatible English-language shell. Invariably, trying to get information out of getopt reliably that it wasn't designed to report programmatically will be tricky. That said, the part about assuming that stderr output comes first is indeed shaky, so I've revised the code to address that. If you how to capture stdout and stderr into separate variables from a single command execution (not involving explicit creation of temporary files), let me know. –  mklement0 Jun 6 '12 at 21:52

I'm not sure if this can help, but getopt(1) uses getopt(3) and if I recall correctly getopt(3) suppress error reporting if the fist character of the OPTSTRING is a colon.

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Using ':' as the first character within optstring suppresses the message output. However, the return code from getopt(1) is still nonzero and the unrecognized option does not get output by getopt(1). –  Rhys Ulerich Sep 21 '12 at 22:04

Do you have to use getopt at all? If you just use

while [ $# -gt 0 ]; do
  case "$1" in
    -d|--diff)
       diff_exec=(${2-})
       shift
       ;;
    -h|--help)
       usage
       exit
       ;;
     --)
       break
       ;;
     *)
       usage
       ;;
    esac
    shift
done

Then you own code is doing the checking.

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I found this to work as the last item in the getopts case statement:

*) eval echo "Unrecognized arg \$$[OPTIND-1]"; usage; exit ;;

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Here is a command line parsing I have used. It could be improved with more parsing logic to handle missing options and parameters.

For the command line: -a AA -b BB -c CC, the result s/b a=AA b=BB c=CC

OPT=( "$@" )  # Parses the command line into words.

for [[ I=0;I<${#OPT[@]};I++ ]]  
   do
      case "${OPT[$I]}" in         
         -a) a=${OPT[$I+1]} ;;         
         -b) b=${OPT[$I+1]} ;;         
         -c) c=${OPT[$I+1]} ;;    
      esac
  done
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