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I have an object graph sprinkled with DataAnnotation attributes, where some properties of objects are classes which themselves have validation attributes, and so on.

In the following scenario:

public class Employee
{
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Address Address { get; set; }
}

public class Address
{
    [Required]
    public string Line1 { get; set; }

    public string Line2 { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string Town { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
}

If I try to validate an Employee's Address with no value for PostalCode, then I would like (and expect) an exception, but I get none. Here's how I'm doing it:

var employee = new Employee
{
    Name = "Neil Barnwell",
    Address = new Address
    {
        Line1 = "My Road",
        Town = "My Town",
        PostalCode = "" // <- INVALID!
    }
};

Validator.ValidateObject(employee, new ValidationContext(employee, null, null));

What other options do I have with Validator that would ensure all properties are validated recursively?

Many thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

My answer got too long to put here, so I turned it into a blog post :)

Recursive Validation Using DataAnnotations

The solution gives you a way to achieve recursive validation using the same basic method you are using now.

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+ 1 for good solution –  Jehof Nov 11 '11 at 6:59
    
Nice, but what about collections? It would be great to have the ability to validate properties like this public IList<Address> Addresses. Anyway, thanks for solution. –  altso Dec 1 '11 at 9:28
    
The attribute isn't evaluated for me. –  Ian Warburton Nov 28 '13 at 10:48
    
... because I didn't do this.... stackoverflow.com/a/5368809/221683 –  Ian Warburton Nov 28 '13 at 11:10
    
same problem as mention by "altso".Any solution yet ?I was trying to post same problem in your website too.Any help –  KumarHarsh Dec 30 '14 at 10:17

Here's an alternative to the opt-in attribute approach. I believe this will traverse the object-graph properly and validate everything.

public static bool TryValidateObjectRecursive<T>(T obj, List<ValidationResult> results)
{
    bool result = TryValidateObject(obj, results);

    var properties = obj.GetType().GetProperties().Where(prop => prop.CanRead).ToList();

    foreach (var property in properties)
    {
        var value = obj.GetPropertyValue(property.Name);

        if (value == null) continue;

        var asEnumerable = value as IEnumerable;
        if (asEnumerable != null)
        {
            foreach (var enumObj in asEnumerable)
            {
                result = TryValidateObjectRecursive(enumObj, results) && result;    
            }
        }
        else
        {
            result = TryValidateObjectRecursive(value, results) && result;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

A few methods in there are helpers, I threw the whole thing on github: https://github.com/reustmd/DataAnnotationsValidatorRecursive/tree/master/DataAnnotationsValidator/DataAnnotationsValidator

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5  
I like this solution, but be beware of infinite loops when the object graph contains cycles. –  Jorrit Schippers Mar 22 '12 at 10:01

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