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I have a problem with declaring a type as passed from parameter type variable.

public static void ShowThisForm(Type passXtraForm, Form parent)
    {
        var xfrm = passXtraForm.GetType();
        xfrm xfrmName = new xfrm();
        xfrmName.Show();
    }

Can I declare a variable as a type from passXtraForm.GetType() and declare it to another variable? Just passing the type of form to another class.

Thanks in advance for the response.

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1  
Can you rephrase the question to make it clearer? –  jeffamaphone Oct 5 '11 at 15:16
6  
Use generics, that's what they are for. –  Candide Oct 5 '11 at 15:17
    
If you are passing a type, you might as well pass an object and use reflection to determine what to do with the object. –  Icarus Oct 5 '11 at 15:17
    
@jeffamaphone: I think that he wants to pass in a type as a method parameter and then create an instance of that type. –  Chris Oct 5 '11 at 15:18
    
this is how i used it.. ShowThisForm(typeOf(frmMain), this); in the method, i dont know what is the type of passXtraForm, is it frmMain or another forms.. so i need to create an instance of that type.. :) –  Vincent Dagpin Oct 5 '11 at 15:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, it doesn't look like you need the parent parameter; I'd eliminate it entirely. Then I'd use generics to do what you're trying to accomplish:

public static void ShowThisForm<T>() where T : Form, new()
{
    T xfrmName = new T();
    xfrmName.Show();
} 

The where T : Form, new() portion of this code is called a type constraint and it prevents you from calling the ShowThisForm method with a type that doesn't have a default constructor and derive from Form.

By indicating that T must have a default constructor, the compiler knows how to resolve new T(); by indicating that T derives from Form, the compiler knows how to call the .Show() method.

So, if you have a form class called MyForm, you could use the following syntax to call this method:

ShowThisForm<MyForm>();

For more documentation, you should take a look at these articles on MSDN:

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thanks sir and thanks for the responds.. got the answer from this code.. ;) –  Vincent Dagpin Oct 5 '11 at 15:32
    
@vrynxzent No problem. I'd encourage you to read the MSDN pages, generics are a powerful concept and can be used to write more flexible /reusable code. –  Donut Oct 5 '11 at 15:34

you could use generics for this:

public static void ShowThisForm<T>(T passXtraForm, Form parent) where T : Form, new()
{
     T xfrmName = new T();
     xfrmName.Show();
}

in this case the type argument is restricted to the Form type and types deriving from Form. anyway, why are you having this method? there are other methods in the Form and Application static classes for finding the forms out there in your app...

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2  
Just what I was about to type. Although I think the first parameter can be omitted and you need an extra constraint on the T: new() –  Hans Kesting Oct 5 '11 at 15:21
    
What about "new" constraint? This won't compile :D –  Matías Fidemraizer Oct 5 '11 at 15:23
    
that's what you get for writing it down here and not using an editor, thanks for the tip I updated the answer, and the parameters stay for sake of clarity (looks like the original) –  mtijn Oct 5 '11 at 15:26

You could change it to something more like this:

    public static void ShowThisForm<T>() where T : Form, new()
    {
        T xfrmName = new T();
        xfrmName.Show();
    }
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Maybe pass in a factory, so that a known interface can instantiate what ever type of object the calling code deems is necessary?

(the below code is a quick sample I typed in here; formatting is off, and design could be better. It's just to give an idea)

static class XFactory
{

  private int _id;

   public XFactory(int formId) {
      _id = formId;
   }

   /// <summary>
   /// Decides which class to instantiate.
   /// </summary>
   public static Form Get()
   {
     switch (_id)
     {
    case 0:
        return new FormA();
    case 1:
    case 2:
        return new FormB();
    case 3:
    default:
        return new FromC();
     }
   }
}


public static void Main()
{

  ShowThisForm(new XFactory(2));

}

public static void ShowThisForm(XFactory formFactory)
    {
        var xfrm = formFactory.Get();
        xfrm.Show();
    }
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This is overkill, if we're talking about something that inherits from a common interface, like a WinForm. heh. –  Michael Paulukonis Oct 5 '11 at 15:36

You can instantiate a class/type via reflection and Activator.CreateInstance(typ, constructorargs), but most likely it would be better to create the object elsewhere and have it be of either a known base class (in your case it looks like form), or have it implement a defined interface that can be used to manipulate it. Very rarely will you need to create an object of totally unknown type.

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