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What's a simple way to get a Perl script to run as a daemon in linux?

Currently, this is on CentOS. I'd want it to start up with the system and shutdown with the system, so some /etc/rc.d/init.d integration would also be nice, but I could always add a custom line to /etc/rc.d/rc.local.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 57 down vote accepted

The easiest way is to use Proc::Daemon.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Proc::Daemon;

Proc::Daemon::Init;

my $continue = 1;
$SIG{TERM} = sub { $continue = 0 };

while ($continue) {
     #do stuff
}

Alternately you could do all of the things Proc::Daemon does:

  1. Fork a child and exits the parent process.
  2. Become a session leader (which detaches the program from the controlling terminal).
  3. Fork another child process and exit first child. This prevents the potential of acquiring a controlling terminal.
  4. Change the current working directory to "/".
  5. Clear the file creation mask.
  6. Close all open file descriptors.

Integrating with the runlevel system is easy. You need a script like the following (replace XXXXXXXXXXXX with the Perl script's name, YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY with a description of what it does, and /path/to with path to the Perl script) in /etc/init.d. Since you are using CentOS, once you have the script in /etc/init.d, you can just use chkconfig to turn it off or on in the various runlevels.

#!/bin/bash
#
# XXXXXXXXXXXX This starts and stops XXXXXXXXXXXX
#
# chkconfig: 2345 12 88
# description: XXXXXXXXXXXX is YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY
# processname: XXXXXXXXXXXX
# pidfile: /var/run/XXXXXXXXXXXX.pid
### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides: $XXXXXXXXXXXX
### END INIT INFO

# Source function library.
. /etc/init.d/functions

binary="/path/to/XXXXXXXXXXXX"

[ -x $binary ] || exit 0

RETVAL=0

start() {
    echo -n "Starting XXXXXXXXXXXX: "
    daemon $binary
    RETVAL=$?
    PID=$!
    echo
    [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ] && touch /var/lock/subsys/XXXXXXXXXXXX

    echo $PID > /var/run/XXXXXXXXXXXX.pid
}

stop() {
    echo -n "Shutting down XXXXXXXXXXXX: "
    killproc XXXXXXXXXXXX
    RETVAL=$?
    echo
    if [ $RETVAL -eq 0 ]; then
        rm -f /var/lock/subsys/XXXXXXXXXXXX
        rm -f /var/run/XXXXXXXXXXXX.pid
    fi
}

restart() {
    echo -n "Restarting XXXXXXXXXXXX: "
    stop
    sleep 2
    start
}

case "$1" in
    start)
        start
    ;;
    stop)
        stop
    ;;
    status)
        status XXXXXXXXXXXX
    ;;
    restart)
        restart
    ;;
    *)
        echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|status|restart}"
    ;;
esac

exit 0
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I got Service X does not support chkconfig. when run a chkconfig -add X. any suggestion? –  Jirapong Jul 31 '09 at 8:04
    
ah, sorry turn out to be my fault. typo on #description. many thanks! –  Jirapong Jul 31 '09 at 8:08
    
Great feedback, big thanks! –  jmolinaso Aug 5 '11 at 13:47
    
Can I just copy this script after replacing XX and YY values to /etc/init.d ? When I run it is not running like a service (In background), How can I make the daemon like httpd ? –  Kishore Relangi Jul 24 '13 at 15:03
1  
@Chap The parent and child processes both exit. The grandchild runs as the daemon. I have updated the link to the new permalink, would one think that a permalink would be permanent. –  Chas. Owens Sep 9 '13 at 16:14

If you don't have Proc::Daemon as suggested by Chas. Owens, here's how you'd do it by hand:

sub daemonize {
   use POSIX;
   POSIX::setsid or die "setsid: $!";
   my $pid = fork ();
   if ($pid < 0) {
      die "fork: $!";
   } elsif ($pid) {
      exit 0;
   }
   chdir "/";
   umask 0;
   foreach (0 .. (POSIX::sysconf (&POSIX::_SC_OPEN_MAX) || 1024))
      { POSIX::close $_ }
   open (STDIN, "</dev/null");
   open (STDOUT, ">/dev/null");
   open (STDERR, ">&STDOUT");
 }
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1  
I'd say it's a lot easier to just install Proc::Daemon than to bother hand-rolling it, but it's always good that TMTOWTDI :) –  David Precious Apr 20 '09 at 18:07
    
Actually that one worked better for me than the previous one. I have control over every input output. Guess that you can find it in Proc::Daemon too! –  jmolinaso Aug 19 '11 at 9:50
3  
Upvoted for not requiring a non-core module, which matters sometimes. –  Aaron Miller Jul 22 '13 at 22:58

I think the easiest way is to use daemon. It allows you to run any process as a daemon. This means you don't have to worry about libraries if you, for example, decided to change to python. To use it, just use:

daemon myscript args

This should be available on most distros, but it might not be installed by default.

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