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While debugging an application that uses Semaphores for cross-process synchronization, I stumbled upon the idea of using PowerShell to take the place of the "other" process. Doing something like this in PowerShell works fine:

// In C# application:
var sem = new Semaphore(0, 1, "CrossProcSem");
sem.WaitOne();

# In PowerShell session:
[1] C:\Projects $ $sem = New-Object System.Threading.Semaphore(0, 1, "CrossProcSem")
[2] C:\Projects $ $sem.Release()

And I can call WaitOne() and Release() repeatedly on that same instance of a Semaphore, as often as I need to.

But when I try to do the same thing with a Mutex, PowerShell keeps claiming that the mutex was abandoned:

[1] C:\Projects $ $mtx = New-Object System.Threading.Mutex($false, "CrossProcMtx")
[2] C:\Projects $ $mtx.WaitOne()
True
[3] C:\Projects $ $mtx.ReleaseMutex()
[4] C:\Projects $ $mtx.WaitOne()
Exception calling "WaitOne" with "0" argument(s): "The wait completed due to an abandoned mutex."
At line:1 char:13
+ $mtx.WaitOne <<<< ()
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [], ParentContainsErrorRecordException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : DotNetMethodException

The error seems to happen any time I call WaitOne() after having acquired the mutex once before, either a previous WaitOne call or asking for it to be initially owned in the constructor:

[5] C:\Projects $ $mtx2 = New-Object System.Threading.Mutex($true)
[6] C:\Projects $ $mtx2.WaitOne()
Exception calling "WaitOne" with "0" argument(s): "The wait completed due to an abandoned mutex."
At line:1 char:14
+ $mtx2.WaitOne <<<< ()
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [], ParentContainsErrorRecordException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : DotNetMethodException

[7] C:\Projects $ $mtx3 = New-Object System.Threading.Mutex
[8] C:\Projects $ $mtx3.WaitOne()
True
[9] C:\Projects $ $mtx3.WaitOne()
Exception calling "WaitOne" with "0" argument(s): "The wait completed due to an abandoned mutex."
At line:1 char:14
+ $mtx3.WaitOne <<<< ()
    + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [], ParentContainsErrorRecordException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : DotNetMethodException

Is Powershell doing some wierd thread shenanigans in the background or am I just completely forgetting how Mutexes work?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

By default, powershell v2.0 (at the console, not the graphical ISE) uses an MTA threadpool. What this means is that each interactive line is executed on a different thread:

PS> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
13
PS> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
10
PS> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
8
PS> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
4

However, a non-interactive script will run under a single thread, that is to say, the thread that invoked the command to run it:

PS> $script = {
>> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
>> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
>> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
>> [threading.thread]::CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId
>> }
>>
PS> & $script
16
16
16
16

If you want to run powershell interactively with a single thread, start the shell with the -STA switch. You can do this interactively:

PS> powershell -sta
Windows PowerShell
Copyright (C) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

PS> $host.runspace | select threadoptions, apartmentstate
ThreadOptions     ApartmentState
-------------     --------------
ReuseThread                  STA

As you can see, powershell will use a single-threaded apartment to execute interactive commands. This is usually the desired choice for working with WPF or WinForms, or if you want to play with system-wide mutexes:

PS> $mtx = New-Object System.Threading.Mutex($false, "CrossProcMtx")
PS> $mtx.WaitOne()
True
PS> $mtx.ReleaseMutex()
PS> $mtx.WaitOne()
True

Btw, powershell v3 (shipping with windows 8 and also available downlevel on win 7) uses -STA as the default mode for the console. The graphical powershell ISE always uses -STA, both in v2 and v3.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - I was about to comment on v3.0, since OP's example worked for me on the 3.0 CTP, and I realized v3.0 (console) was STA by default. Then saw that you done that as well :) –  manojlds Oct 5 '11 at 17:21
    
+1 Clear samples. Clear answer. –  CB. Oct 5 '11 at 19:57

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