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Here is my code

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
FILE* fp;
int i;
fp=fopen("newfile","r");
if(fp==NULL)
{
   printf("hhaha");
   return 0;
}
char str[20];
for(i=0;i<2;i++)
{
    fgets(str,20,fp);
    printf("%s",str);
} 
return 0;
}

Now if my newfile has text

my name
is xyz

then how come when i print the two lines are printed in two newlines? where does the newline character come from?

share|improve this question
    
@cwallenpoole are you sure you didn't change the whole point of the question with that edit? If there was an empty line in his test file, then when printf fired wouldn't it have printed two carriage returns on the screen? –  DJ Quimby Oct 5 '11 at 17:08
    
@DJQuimby there was no empty lines. there were just two text lines separated by carriage return. –  Kraken Oct 5 '11 at 17:09
    
Ok, fair enough. I misinterpreted it. –  DJ Quimby Oct 5 '11 at 17:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

fgets sets the pointer to a char * representing the line of the file including the \n at the end of the line. (As is the case with most strings, it will also be '\0' terminated)

A file with this:

This
is
my
file

Will have this from fgets:

This\n\0,is\n\0,my\n\0,file\n\01


1The final value may not be include \n. That will depend on whether it is a \n terminated file.

share|improve this answer
    
i.e. my str on first iteration gives me "my name\n"? –  Kraken Oct 5 '11 at 17:08
    
or it contains "my name\0\n" .. what actually my str is? –  Kraken Oct 5 '11 at 17:11
    
Yeah, you are reading the characters to the end of the line, including the \n. So the string is actually [m][y][ ][n][a][m][e][\n][\0] –  Robert Martin Oct 5 '11 at 17:11
    
@Robert Martin isnt it a bad thing for me.. what if i wanted to check if my str was equal to "my name"? it never will return me true? then why shall i use fgets at all? –  Kraken Oct 5 '11 at 17:14
    
@Karan You have to account for this. You can do a strlen() to check if the last char is a \n and if it is, set it to be \0 first. Or you could do something fancy like `int strcmpfancy(char *a, char *b){while ((*a)&&(*a == *b)){a++; b++} return (!(*a) && (!(*b) || *b=='\n');} Untested –  Robert Martin Oct 6 '11 at 1:47

from man fgets

gets() reads a line from stdin into the buffer pointed to by s until either a terminating newline or EOF, which it replaces with '\0'. No check for buffer overrun is performed (see BUGS below).

fgets() reads in at most one less than size characters from stream and stores them into the buffer pointed to by s. Reading stops after an EOF or a newline. If a newline is read, it is stored into the buffer. A '\0' is stored after the last character in the buffer.

and thus fgets behaviour is different from what you might expect

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From the linux man page for fgets():

fgets() reads in at most one less than size characters from stream and stores them into the buffer pointed to by s. Reading stops after an EOF or a newline. If a newline is read, it is stored into the buffer. A '\0' is stored after the last character in thebuffer.

share|improve this answer
    
isnt it a bad thing for me.. what if i wanted to check if my str was equal to "my name"? it never will return me true? then why shall i use fgets at all? –  Kraken Oct 5 '11 at 17:14
    
@Karan: Use strchr() to locate a newline within the string OR simply use strlen() and if the last character is a newline, set it a '\0'. –  Brian McFarland Oct 5 '11 at 17:55

fgets() includes the newline when reading into the string - that's how fgets() is defined to work. From the standard:

No additional characters are read after a new-line character (which is retained) or after end-of-file.

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