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I have created the following javascript object dynamically (from PHP):

var t_feed = '';
t_feed += '[';
t_feed += '{name: "Tom Thumb", thumbnail: "images/Tom_Thumb.jpg", link: "http://twitter.com/cnnbrk/statuses/121630545879900161", description: "This is the body of the tweat"},';
t_feed += '{name: "Tom Thumb", thumbnail: "images/Tom_Thumb.jpg", link: "http://twitter.com/cnnbrk/statuses/121622456363524097", description: "This is the body of the tweat"},';
t_feed += '{name: "Tom Thumb", thumbnail: "images/Tom_Thumb.jpg", link: "http://twitter.com/cnnbrk/statuses/121614678341320706", description: "This is the body of the tweat"}';
t_feed += ']';
twitterFeeds[0] = eval(t_feed);

This works fine in IE8+, but I get the following error in IE7:

SCRIPT5007: Unable to get value of the property 'thumbnail': object is null or undefined.

I get this when I try and access the thumbnail property like this:

$.each(twitterFeeds[id], function(i,item){
    alert(item.thumbnail);
});

Why does that fail in IE7 and is there a different way of defining a list or object that WILL work?

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2  
Why are you generating a string and then evaling it instead of just inserting the code directly? And why are you doing it by hand instead of using json_encode? –  Quentin Oct 5 '11 at 18:06
1  
Why are you using eval? Why not just build the object? –  John Hartsock Oct 5 '11 at 18:06
1  
Why are you assigning it to a string and then eval-ing it? It's just a JSON t_feed = [{'name':"Tom Thumb", .... ] –  CD001 Oct 5 '11 at 18:06
    
Did you try twitterFeeds[0] = eval('(' + t_feed ')'); –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 5 '11 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As a general rule, if you’re using eval() there’s probably something wrong with your design.

You may want to try parsing this string as JSON instead of using eval(), and then work from there.

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you need to declare the array first

var twitterFeeds = []; // declaration
twitterFeeds[0] = eval(t_feed);
alert(twitterFeeds);
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He says, "This works fine in IE8+, but I get the following error in IE7:". –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 5 '11 at 18:08
    
@Mufasa try the code, then talk –  Wesley Crushed Oct 5 '11 at 18:13
    
@BheshGurung different behaviors, in ie6-7 an array instance is required –  Wesley Crushed Oct 5 '11 at 18:14
    
var twitterFeeds = []; is necessary in ie6-7. –  Wesley Crushed Oct 5 '11 at 18:22
    
@wes: Sorry. I thought he had just picked a part of his code and that declared somewhere (above). Anyway +1. Learned something. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 5 '11 at 18:28

Your use of eval is unnecessary. Use the code directly:

var t_feed = [
 {name: "Tom Thumb", thumbnail: "images/Tom_Thumb.jpg", link: "http://twitter.com/cnnbrk/statuses/121630545879900161", description: "This is the body of the tweat"},
 {name: "Tom Thumb", thumbnail: "images/Tom_Thumb.jpg", link: "http://twitter.com/cnnbrk/statuses/121622456363524097", description: "This is the body of the tweat"},
 {name: "Tom Thumb", thumbnail: "images/Tom_Thumb.jpg", link: "http://twitter.com/cnnbrk/statuses/121614678341320706", description: "This is the body of the tweat"}
];
twitterFeeds[0] = t_feed;

UPDATE: As @Quentin pointed out, it would be even cleaner to use PHP (assuming a valid class is created) and initialize a new Array with the instances in the array, then use json_encode on it. That way you don't have to worry about the syntax and escaping characters safely.

UPDATE 2: If you don't initialize twitterFeeds first it will also fail. Have you done that? If not, change to var twitterFeeds = [ t_feed ];

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