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I am playing around with templates and have tried the following but get 'Cannot convert 'MyClass' to 'bool' error?

#include "Unit2.h"
using namespace std;

template <class T>
T GetMax (T a, T b) {
  T result;
  result = (a > b) ? a : b;
  return (result);
}

int main () {
  MyClass k1( 10, "A" );
  MyClass k2( 50, "B" );
  MyClass k3( 0,"" );
  k3 = GetMax<MyClass>(k1,k2);

  cout << k3.GetName() << endl;

  return 0;
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have defined a > operator for myclass as follows:

MyClass& MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs)
{
    MyClass& rkReturn = ( m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize ) ? *this : rhs;
    return rkReturn; 
}
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Good question though except for the title. You showed the error message and all relevant code! There's even a question mark! –  Mooing Duck Oct 5 '11 at 18:23
    
@Joe: Did you get your answer? Which one was it? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 10 '11 at 15:06
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9 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your > operator should return a bool, not a MyClass reference.

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the operator> too... –  sehe Oct 5 '11 at 18:18
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Your operator> returns a MyClass& instead of a bool. By using it in the conditional operator, the compiler is trying to coerce the returned MyClass to a bool.

Change

MyClass& MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs)
{
    MyClass& rkReturn = ( m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize ) ? *this : rhs;
    return rkReturn; 
}

to

bool MyClass::operator>(const MyClass &rhs) const
{
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize;
}
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While you're correcting the operator>, note that it should be a const function. –  Mooing Duck Oct 5 '11 at 18:24
    
@MooingDuck Done. –  Oscar Korz Oct 5 '11 at 18:43
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The syntax x ? y : z requires x to be convertable to a bool type. You give it the expression (a > b), which calls your operator MyClass& MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs), which returns a MyClass by reference. The compiler cannot convert this reference to a bool, and gets confused. MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs) should return a bool.

bool MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs) const //also, it should be a const function
{
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize 
}
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Your > operator needs to return a bool (or something that can be automatically converted to a bool, such as an int), not a MyClass&.

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You need to return bool from operator>.

So try this:

bool MyClass::operator>(const MyClass &rhs)
{
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize;
}

It would be better if you make this a const function, by putting the keyword on the right side of the function, as shown below:

bool MyClass::operator>(const MyClass &rhs) const 
{                                        // ^^^^^ this makes the function const
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize;
}

Put const on the declaration also.

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operator> should be declared/defined to return bool, not MyClass&.

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But isn't this the power of templates, for example..T result; result = (a > b) ? a : b; result is of type T which is MyClass, why can't i return that? –  Yos Oct 5 '11 at 18:20
    
In general, yes, a method's return type can be a template parameter. But consider the semantics of "greater than"... any other result type than bool would be strange. –  Dabbler Oct 5 '11 at 18:23
1  
@JoeSaddigh: In the terenary operator (a > b) ? a : b; the result of (a>b) is expected to be an bool and not MyClass and hence your > operator should return a bool. –  Alok Save Oct 5 '11 at 18:29
    
@Joe: a and b are MyClass, sure, and that's what gets returned. But in order for the conditional to work, a > b quite obviously has to be a bool. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 10 '11 at 15:12
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operator > should return bool and not MyClass & like this:

bool MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs)
{
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize;
}
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Sorry ... there are so many posts coming into this thread, I editing the wrong post by accident. –  Jason Oct 5 '11 at 18:22
    
Thank you all for your posts!! I see exactly what you mean I had a moment of madness. I was getting confused about all of the Ts and stuff lol... In addition I copied most of the syntax from the assignment operator which naturally returns a ref. :-) –  Yos Oct 5 '11 at 20:07
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Try this

bool MyClass::operator>(MyClass &rhs)
{
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize ;
}
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The operator> for MyClass should simply define whether one instance of the class is greater than the other, and it should return type bool, not type MyClass&. Modify it so that it looks like the following:

bool MyClass::operator>(const MyClass &rhs) const
{
    return m_iSize > rhs.m_iSize; 
}

This will now properly test whether the current instance of MyClass is larger than the MyClass instance on the right-hand side of the > operator in such an expression.

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