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I need to build a query that takes a list of integers and concatenates a few SELECTs with INTERSECTs using SQL Server 2008 R2. Here's basically the query I need to build, but the number of SELECTS will vary:

SELECT col1
FROM table1
WHERE col2 = 1

INTERSECT

SELECT col1
FROM table1
WHERE col2 = 2

INTERSECT

SELECT col1
FROM table1
WHERE col2 = 3

I have a table-valued function that will take a comma-separated list of IDs and create a table out of them. But I basically need to loop through that table-valued function to build the SQL statement and then execute it.

How do I go about creating that loop? Or is there possibly a better way to do this (I can do it in code if it would be better)?

EDIT: To clarify the purpose of using an INTERSECT, here is what I'm doing. The structure I'm using is for associating parent products with child products based on selection of attributes (size, color, etc). For each combination of attributes, there is a single matching child product. So each select is selecting all the child products mapped to an individual attribute value. I then have to find the intersection of each of those to find the one child product that matches that combination of attributes. If there's a better way to do the query, I'm open to it. I know inner joins would be the same result but would still require the same iteration.

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Any reason why you could do this is 1 select? –  Ash Burlaczenko Oct 5 '11 at 19:27
    
The structure I'm using is for associating parent products with child products based on selection of attributes (size, color, etc). For each combination of attributes, there is a single matching child product. So each select is selecting all the child products mapped to an individual attribute value. I then have to find the intersection of each of those to find the one child product that matches that combination of attributes. If there's a better way to do the query, I'm open to it. I know inner joins would be the same result but would still require the same iteration. –  jwynveen Oct 5 '11 at 19:32
    
Why not just use the "In" keyword and pass in a list of Ids as a table ? Select col1 From table Where col2 In (select id from [setofIds]) –  Charles Bretana Oct 5 '11 at 19:32
    
@CharlesBretana, I would do that but it ends up returning too many results. In essence, if you read my comment above about what I'm doing, it would then return all child products with any of those attribute values instead of returning the one child with that combination of attributes. –  jwynveen Oct 5 '11 at 19:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming temporary table is called #temp:

SELECT col1
  FROM table1 t
       INNER JOIN
       #temp v
       ON (t.col2 = v.col2)
GROUP BY
       col1
HAVING COUNT(*) = (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM #temp)
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Wow! The simplicity of that is amazing, and my initial test shows that it does what I need. I'll have to test some more complex scenarios than just the single one I'm doing now, but it looks like it should do the trick. Thank you! Would you mind elaborating on how the HAVING clause works? That's the one part that I don't quite understand and it seems to be the part doing all the work. –  jwynveen Oct 5 '11 at 19:53
    
HAVING allows you use an aggregate function as if it were in a WHERE clause. I often use it to find duplicate records: "SELECT x FROM tbl GROUP BY x HAVING COUNT(*) > 1". –  Darryl Peterson Oct 5 '11 at 20:09

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