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I'm trying to use C# to iterate through an array.

The array consists of the letters of the alphabet.

I'm doing this inline in the view, which I know is not ideal. But, for each letter I need to write HTML to the document.

Basically I need to do the following JS - just don't know the C# syntax:

var myArray = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"; //I think ToCharArray();
for (var i=0, i < myArray.length, i++)
{
    if (somecondition)
    {
        write some html;
    } 
   else
   {
        write some other html;
    }
}

Right now there are 26 versions of this in a user control. I'm a front end developer and this was handed to me by the back end. Just trying to find a more efficient way to do it for maintainability's sake.

<% if (Convert.ToInt32(Model.State.Cities.GetCityCountByAlphabet("A")) == 0) { %>
<span class="no-link">A</span>
<% } else { %>
<a href="#to-A">A</a>
<% } %>
share|improve this question
    
Is this a homework assignment? If it is, that's ok, but it changes the answer. If it's not, you should probably have a pretty good reason to want to do this. Can you let us know what the reason for doing this is so that we can give you a more reasonable answer beyond "foreach (var item in myArray) { // do stuff }" – D. Patrick Oct 5 '11 at 20:48
    
I did do some research on this and just can't seem to figure it out. I don't know C# at all. Hope I don't seem like a slacker. – user699242 Oct 5 '11 at 20:50
    
Is this .net web forms? Replacing the code you added would be great, but it'd be even better to use some built-in web forms data bound controls like a repeater or something (IMO). Is that an option in this case or does it have to all be written in the "code be-front" (i.e., inline code in the aspx files)? – D. Patrick Oct 5 '11 at 21:08
    
I really don't see why this should be closed. – John Saunders Oct 10 '11 at 2:00

The other answers are reasonable, but personally I would be inclined to simply write

foreach(char c in "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")
{ ... }

and skip the indexer, local variable, blah blah blah.

More generally: if your problem solving technique every time you don't know the syntax of C# is going to be to ask on StackOverflow, you're not going to be very efficient at work. Why not learn basic C#? If you already understand JavaScript it shouldn't be too hard to pick up the basic idioms and syntax of procedural code. The type system is rather different, but the basic control flows are quite similar.

share|improve this answer

C# strings can also be used like arrays:

for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++) 
    //str[i] is a char
share|improve this answer
    
Just not for assignment. – canon Oct 5 '11 at 20:48
    
...because strings are immutable. – SLaks Oct 5 '11 at 20:48
    
Yes, that's why. – canon Oct 5 '11 at 20:50

The simplest way to iterate over the characters in a string is to use foreach:

foreach (char c in yourString)
{
    // ...
}

This will also work on an array.

If you just want to iterate over the letters A to Z in order you don't even need to store a string containing all the letters. You can instead use this:

for (char c = 'A'; c <= 'Z'; c++)
{
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

I actually did something like this a few years ago so I pulled up my code and modified it to try and show it as an example based on what you've shown:

            <div id="azindex">
            <ul id="index">
            <%
            var myArray = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ".ToCharArray();
            var letters = Model.State.Cities.Select(city => city.Name[0]).Distinct(); //assume array setup based on same database values
            var letterArray = myArray.Where(chr => letters.Any(letter => letter == chr));
            foreach (var letter in letters) 
            {
            %>
                <li><a href='#<%= letter %>'><%= letter %></a></li>
            <%
            } 
            %>
           </ul>
        </div>

Assuming using your example where you want to write out some other html when the condition doesn't match I'd modify my code somewhat similiar to the following uncompilable code:

for (var i=0; i < myArray.Length; i++)
{
var letter =  myArray[i];
if (letters.Any(p => p == letter)
{
    <span class="no-link">{letter}</span>
} 
else
{
    <a href="#to-{letter}">{letter}</a>
}
}
share|improve this answer

to access nth character of a string use

myArray[i]

that will do

share|improve this answer

It's just about the same if you want it to be:

var myArray = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ"; //I think ToCharArray();
for (var i=0; i < myArray.Length; i++) {
    char letter = myArray[0];
    if (somecondition) {
        write some html;
    } else {
        write some other html;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
var characters = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
foreach(char ch in characters) 
{
    if (somecondition) 
    {
        Response.Write("some html");
    } 
    else 
    {
        Repsonse.Write("some other html");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can either use:

Char c = myArray[i];

or something like this:

StringBuilder html = new StringBuilder();
foreach(Char c in myArray)
{
    if (c = something)
        html.Append(somehtml);
    else
        html.Append(otherhtml);
}

I hope that this will help you.

share|improve this answer

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