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Why does the padding of the outer div collapse to the margin of the inner div in the example below?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Col Padding</title>
        <link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' media='all' href='http://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset/reset.css' />
        <style type='text/css'>
            .padding
            {
                padding: 50px;
                background-color: green;
                zoom: 1;
                width: 500px;
            }
            .margin
            {
                margin: 100px;
                background-color: blue;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class='padding'><div class='margin'>Content</div></div>
    </body>
</html>

This is in IE 7.0.5730.13
IE7 collapses the green padding
This is in FF 6.0.2
FF and Chrome add the green padding and blue margins

@David - idk I only have IE7
@Faust - I've attached screenshots now. I examined them with XRAY to see that they are different.
@veritas - Changing DOCTYPES didn't seem to change anything. I checked and IE7 is rendering in Standards mode.

share|improve this question
    
Does it? I also noticed an IE7 tag, is this happening in IE7 only? –  David Oct 5 '11 at 21:00
    
The behavior of this in IE8 in compatibility-view mode (a crude IE7 simulation) appears the same as FireFox + Chrome. If you have actual IE7, could you post a screen-shot? And it is as I would expect -- or is that what you'd want an explanation for? –  Faust Oct 5 '11 at 21:03
    
Maybe using an older doctype would help? Ie7 Doesn't understand HTML5 –  veritas Oct 5 '11 at 22:44

5 Answers 5

Try adding float:left.

Not the best option, but sometimes works.

share|improve this answer
.padding
        {
            padding: 50px;
            background-color: green;
            zoom: 1;
            width: 500px;
            overflow:hidden; /* blocks margin collapse */
        }

edit: needs a workaround

    <style type="text/css">
        .padding
        {
            background-color: green;
            width: 500px;
        }
        .p
        {
            padding:10px;
        }
        .margin
        {
            margin: 10px;
            background-color: blue;
        }
    </style>

    <div class="padding">
    <div class="p">
        <div class="margin">Content</div>
    </div>
</div>

not so good by the way... I don't think there's something better, I've tried lot of hacks

:(

share|improve this answer
    
Tried this. It didn't work. –  John K Oct 6 '11 at 17:19
    
I see, I'm trying too... fu**** internet explorer –  user652649 Oct 6 '11 at 17:32
    
@JohnK appended some code, not so good by the way, a wrapper element is needed, probably. I'm interested to see if there is some workaround for this sh*t! voted the question –  user652649 Oct 6 '11 at 17:38

The following works but I don't like it. I don't like having to manually set the line-height in .margin and I don't like having to put in a &nbsp;

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Col Padding</title>
        <link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' media='all' href='http://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset/reset.css' />
        <style type='text/css'>
            .padding
            {
                padding: 50px;
                background-color: green;
                width: 500px;
                line-height: 0px;
            }
            .margin
            {
                margin: 100px;
                background-color: blue;
                line-height: 16px;
            }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div class='padding'>&nbsp;<div class='margin'>Content</div></div>
    </body>
</html>

Can anyone improve or offer a better solution?

share|improve this answer

try this

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
        <html>
            <head>
                <title>Col Padding</title>
                <link rel='stylesheet' type='text/css' href='http://meyerweb.com/eric/tools/css/reset/reset.css' />
                <style type='text/css'>
                    body{
                        font-size:1em;
                    }
                    .padding
                    {
                        padding: 150px;
                        background-color: green;
                        width: 500px;
                        line-height: 0px;
                    }
                    .padding span
                    {
                        background-color: blue;
                        padding:15px 5px;
                        display:block;
                        color:#fff;
                    }
                </style>
            </head>
            <body>
                <div class='padding'><span>Content</span></div>
            </body>
        </html>
share|improve this answer
    
This works, though it completely dodges the margin vs padding question so it only serves as an alternative, not an answer. –  John K Oct 18 '11 at 21:05

I googled for that issue and found nothing. Cause it is rather seldom situation when you need to use both parent's padding and child's margin. But if it is inevitable to you, may be it is better to apply 150px padding-top to parent element specially to IE6, 7 ? In my opinion it is better than insert space, apply line-height to 0 and than to redefine this property to all inner elements.

.padding
        {
            padding: 50px;
            background-color: green;
            width: 500px;
        }
*html .padding
        {
            padding: 150px;
        }
.margin
        {
            margin: 100px;
            background-color: blue;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to work. In addition, I don't see what the *html .padding rule is for as it will be overridden by the .padding rule. –  John K Oct 18 '11 at 21:02

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