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Entity Framework 4.1 Code First works great creating tables and relationships. Is it possible to create sql views or stored procedure using Code first approach? Any pointers regarding this will be highly appreciated. Thanks a lot!

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

EF code-first approach expects that there is no logic in the database. That means no stored procedures and no database views. Because of that code-first approach doesn't provide any mechanism to generate such constructs automatically for you. How could it do that if it means generating logic?

You must create them yourselves in custom database initializer by manual executing creation scripts. I don't think that this custom SQL constructs can be handled by SQL migrations.

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Yes - the equivalent of a View in EF Code First is a table with a copy of the data. Your code is responsible for maintaining that secondary table. – Chris Moschini Oct 19 '11 at 8:11
11  
Sorry to disagree but Stored procedures should be considered to be created also, so from my perspective that's a missing feature, and it should be added. Stored procedures are part of the database and also views. It is true they don't have to be OVER used but they exist and they have to be treated as first citizens they are in the database world – Eugenio Miró Sep 11 '12 at 12:39
3  
@EugenioMiró: Yes that is true but in such case you should use database first approach instead of code first. If you want to create database logic so do it but do it directly in the database and let EF create model from that database instead of hacking it in opposite direction. – Ladislav Mrnka Sep 11 '12 at 12:55
    
Is it possible to use the database approach first with the FluentAPI? – Chuck Conway May 30 '14 at 0:11
    
Stored Procedures (or any arbitrary database structure) can be added to the Database using the DbMigration.Sql method in a migration EF5+. Alas, Code First still does not have a mechanism to track them. – Jesan Fafon Oct 27 '14 at 17:13

We support stored procedures in our Entity Framework Code First Migrations. Our approach is to create some folder to hold the .sql files (~/Sql/ for example). Create .sql files in the folder for both creating and dropping the stored procedure. E.g. Create_sp_DoSomething.sql and Drop_sp_DoSomething. Because the SQL runs in a batch and CREATE PROCEDURE.. must be the first statement in a batch, make the CREATE PROCEDURE... the first statement in the file. Also, don't put GO after the DROP.... Add a resources file to your project, if you don't have one already. Drag the .sql files from solution explorer into the Files view of the Resources designer. Now create an empty migration (Add-Migration SomethingMeaningful_sp_DoSomething) and use:

namespace MyApplication.Migrations
{
    using System;
    using System.Data.Entity.Migrations;

    public partial class SomethingMeaningful_sp_DoSomething : DbMigration
    {
        public override void Up()
        {
            this.Sql(Properties.Resources.Create_sp_DoSomething);
        }

        public override void Down()
        {
            this.Sql(Properties.Resources.Drop_sp_DoSomething);
        }
    }
}

~/Sql/Create_sp_DoSomething.sql

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[sp_DoSomething] AS
BEGIN TRANSACTION
-- Your stored procedure here
COMMIT TRANSACTION
GO

~/Sql/Drop_sp_DoSomething.sql

DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[sp_DoSomething]
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Why do I need a resource ? – majkinetor Apr 25 '13 at 10:52
2  
That can't be right, because in one moment you may have need to change that stored procedure, which will require different migration to keep different version. – majkinetor Apr 29 '13 at 8:42
1  
yes, a new migration, but since its already existing procedure you will have its first migration that introduced it, in its resource. Since you will now add it to another one, you will have 2 exactly the same files in 2 different resources. I.E as soon as you change stored procedure, the first resource will become invalid, so to speak. So this method you use is enough only to create or drop procedures, not to alter and un-alter them. For that, you need to keep them as strings, i.e. embedded fullly, not files which are linked. – majkinetor Apr 29 '13 at 15:13
1  
Nice solution. I like to have the SQL in separate files from the C#-code. Next time you update the SP, couldnt you just add another sql-file with "Alter SP" in the Up-method? Or create a new migration and do the Down method first when doing the Up. – cederlof May 10 '13 at 13:28
1  
@Carl, Yes, thats how I do it. – majkinetor Feb 8 '14 at 12:15

At first sight I really like the approach of Carl G but it involves a lot of manual interaction. In my scenario, I always drop all stored procedures, views... and recreate them whenever there is a change in the database. This way we are sure everything is up-to-date with the latest version.

Recreation happens by setting the following Initializer:

Database.SetInitializer(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<MyContext, Configuration>());

Then our seed method will get called whenever there is a migration ready

protected override void Seed(DeploymentLoggingContext context)
    {
        // Delete all stored procs, views
        foreach (var file in Directory.GetFiles(Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, "Sql\\Seed"), "*.sql"))
        {
            context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(File.ReadAllText(file), new object[0]);
        }

        // Add Stored Procedures
        foreach (var file in Directory.GetFiles(Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, "Sql\\StoredProcs"), "*.sql"))
        {
            context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(File.ReadAllText(file), new object[0]);
        }
    }

SQL Statements are stored in *.sql files for easy editing. Make sure your files have "Build Action" set to "Content" and "Copy to Output Directory" set to "Copy Always". We lookup the folders and execute all scripts inside. Don't forget to exclude "GO" statements in your SQL because they cannot be executed with ExecuteSqlCommand().

My current directory layout is as follows:

Project.DAL
+ Migrations
+ Sql
++ Seed
+++ dbo.cleanDb.sql
++ StoredProcs
+++ dbo.sp_GetSomething.sql

Now you just need to drop extra stored procedures in the folder and everything will get updated appropriately.

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1  
Thanks for sharing. This is similar to what I am trying to do. – Chuck Conway May 30 '14 at 0:13
1  
Nice answer, but drop and create indexes? Every time the app runs? Really? – Martin Capodici Oct 28 '14 at 0:20
    
@MartinCapodici good catch, I don't think that's necessary – emp Oct 28 '14 at 13:16
1  
You can leave the "GO" statements in the script if you split the file text on "GO" and execute each string in the array separately. I suggest using new Regex("GO", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase) and skip executing empty strings. – Kevin Rood Nov 18 '14 at 17:55
    
I use var baseDir = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory.Replace("\\bin\\Debug", string.Empty) + "\\Migrations\\postDeploy";. I have a postdeploy folder with my scripts at solution level within my Migrations folder. This way I don't dump unneeded files with my release and i don't have to set them as resources. – Jmorvan Jul 24 '15 at 21:56

To expand on bbodenmiller's answer, In Entity Framework 6, the DbMigration class has methods such as AlterStoredProcedure which allow for modification of stored procedures without having to drop all the way down to raw SQL.

Here's an example of an Up() migration method which alters an existing SQL Server stored procedure named EditItem which takes three parameters of type int, nvarchar(50), and smallmoney, respectively:

public partial class MyCustomMigration : DbMigration
{
    public override void Up()
    {
        this.AlterStoredProcedure("dbo.EditItem", c => new
        {
            ItemID = c.Int(),
            ItemName = c.String(maxLength:50),
            ItemCost = c.Decimal(precision: 10, scale: 4, storeType: "smallmoney")
        }, @" (Stored procedure body SQL goes here) "   
    }

    //...
}

On my machine, this migration script produces the following SQL:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[EditItem]
    @ItemID [int],
    @ItemName [nvarchar](50),
    @ItemCost [smallmoney]
AS
BEGIN
    (Stored procedure body SQL goes here)
END
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While I like Carl's answer, it looks like a lot of work to maintain for not much payoff. Thanks! – Jon Peterson Jan 20 at 16:14

It appears to be poorly documented however it appears you can now do some Stored Procedure manipulation using AlterStoredProcedure, CreateStoredProcedure, DropStoredProcedure, MoveStoredProcedure, RenameStoredProcedure in Entity Framework 6. I haven't tried them yet so can't yet give an example of how to use them.

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You an find an example here: c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/ff2f08/… – Jas Dec 30 '14 at 17:11
    
Still poorly documented. Thanks for the example Jas – Darrell Lloyd Harvey Apr 20 at 19:53

emp's design works like a champion! I'm using his pattern but I also map stored procedures inside of my DbContext class which allows simply calling those context methods instead of using SqlQuery() and calling the procedures directly from my repository. As things can get a bit hairy when the application grows, I've created a check within my Seed method that makes sure the actual stored procedure parameter count match up to the parameter count on the mapping method. I've also updated the DROP loop emp mentioned. Instead of having to maintain a separate folder/file for the drop statements, I simply read the first line of each sql file and replace CREATE with DROP (just make sure the first line is always just CREATE PROCEDURE ProcName). This way all procedures in my StoredProcs folder get dropped and recreated each time Update-Database is ran. The drop is also wrapped in a try-catch block in case the procedure is new. For the procedure parameter count to work, you'll need to make sure you wrap a BEGIN/END block around your tsql since each line of the file is read up to BEGIN. Also make sure each sp parameter is on new line.

        // Drop Stored Procs
        foreach (var file in Directory.GetFiles(Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, "..\\DataContext\\SiteMigrations\\StoredProcs"), "*.sql"))
        {
            // Try to drop proc if its already created
            // Without this, for new procs, seed method fail on trying to delete
            try
            {
                StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(file);
                // Read first line of file to create drop command (turning CREATE [dbo].[TheProc] into DROP [dbo].[TheProc])
                string dropCommand = reader.ReadLine().Replace("CREATE", "DROP");

                context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(dropCommand, new object[0]);
            }
            catch { }

        }

        // Add Stored Procs
        foreach (var file in Directory.GetFiles(Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, "..\\DataContext\\SiteMigrations\\StoredProcs"), "*.sql"))
        {
            // File/Proc names must match method mapping names in DbContext
            int lastSlash = file.LastIndexOf('\\');
            string fileName = file.Substring(lastSlash + 1);
            string procName = fileName.Substring(0, fileName.LastIndexOf('.'));

            // First make sure proc mapping in DbContext contain matching parameters.  If not throw exception.
            // Get parameters for matching mapping
            MethodInfo mi = typeof(SiteContext).GetMethod(procName);

            if (mi == null)
            {
                throw new Exception(String.Format("Stored proc mapping for {0} missing in DBContext", procName));
            }

            ParameterInfo[] methodParams = mi.GetParameters();
            // Finished getting parameters

            // Get parameters from stored proc
            int spParamCount = 0;
            using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(file))
            {
                string line;                    
                while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null) 
                {
                    // If end of parameter section, break out
                    if (line.ToUpper() == "BEGIN")
                    {
                        break;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (line.Contains("@"))
                        {
                            spParamCount++;
                        }
                    }                        
                }
            }
            // Finished get parameters from stored proc

            if (methodParams.Count() != spParamCount)
            {
                string err = String.Format("Stored proc mapping for {0} in DBContext exists but has {1} parameter(s)" +
                    " The stored procedure {0} has {2} parameter(s)", procName, methodParams.Count().ToString(), spParamCount.ToString());
                throw new Exception(err);
            }
            else
            {
                context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(File.ReadAllText(file), new object[0]);
            }
        }

Enjoy!

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As Ladislav pointed out, DbContext in general does tend to minimize the logic in the database, but it is possible to execute custom SQL by using context.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand() or context.Database.SqlQuery().

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