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Between utf8_general_ci and utf8_unicode_ci, are there any differences in terms of performance?

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1  
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/1036454/… –  unor Aug 28 '12 at 20:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 430 down vote accepted

There are at least two important differences:

  • Accuracy of sorting

    utf8_unicode_ci is based on the Unicode standard for sorting, and sorts accurately in a very wide range of languages.

    utf8_general_ci comes very close to correct Unicode sorting in many common languages, but has a number of inaccuracies in some languages making in unsuitable for correct sorting in those languages.

  • Performance

    utf8_general_ci is faster at comparisons and sorting, because it takes a bunch of performance-related shortcuts.

    utf8_unicode_ci uses a much more complex comparison algorithm which aims for correct sorting according in a very wide range of languages. This makes it slower to sort and compare large numbers of fields.

Unicode defines complex sets of rules for how characters should be sorted. These rules need to take into account language-specific conventions; not everybody sorts their characters in what we would call 'alphabetical order'.

  • As far as Latin (ie "European") languages go, there is not much difference between the Unicode sorting and the simplified utf8_general_ci sorting in MySQL, but there are still a few differences:

    For examples, the Unicode collation sorts "ß" like "ss", and "Œ" like "OE" as people using those characters would normally want, whereas utf8_general_ci sorts them as single characters (presumably like "s" and "e" respectively).

  • In non-latin languages, such as Asian languages or languages with different alphabets, there may be a lot more differences between Unicode sorting and the simplified utf8_general_ci sorting. The suitability of utf8_general_ci will depend heavily on the language used. For some languages, it'll be quite inadequate.

Some Unicode characters are defined as ignorable, which means they shouldn't count toward the sort order and the comparison should move on to the next character instead. utf8_unicode_ci handles these properly.

What should you use?

There is almost never any reason to use utf_general_ci anymore, as we have left behind the point where CPU speed is low enough that the performance difference would be important. Your database will almost certainly be limited by quite other bottlenecks than this nowadays. The difference in performance is only going to be measurable in extremely specialised situations, and if that's you, you'd already know about it. If you're experiencing slow sorting, in almost all cases it'll be an issue with your indexes/query plan. Changing your collation function should not be high on the list of things to troubleshoot.

When I originally wrote this answer (over 4 years ago) I said that if you wanted, you could use utf8_general_ci most of the time, and only use utf8_unicode_ci when sorting was going to be important enough to justify the performance cost. However, the performance cost is no longer really relevant (and it may not have been back then, either). It's more important to sort properly in whichever language your users are using.

One other thing I'll add is that even if you know your application only supports the English language, it may still need to deal with people's names, which can often contain characters used in other languages in which it is just as important to sort correctly. Using the Unicode rules for everything helps add peace of mind that the very smart Unicode people have worked very hard to make sorting work properly.

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Thanks for the great explanation. –  KahWee Teng May 4 '09 at 16:52
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Great answer Thomas! Thank you for explaining this in such detail. Now I know, and knowing is half the battle. –  jjwdesign Feb 2 '12 at 21:38
32  
@KahWeeTeng You should never, ever use utf8_general_ci: it simply doesn’t work. It’s a throwback to the bad old days of ASCII stooopeeedity from fifty years ago. Unicode case-insensitive matching cannot be done without the foldcase map from the UCD. For example, “Σίσυφος” has three different sigmas in it; or how the lowercase of “TSCHüẞ” is “tschüβ”, but the uppercase of “tschüβ” is “TSCHÜSS”. You can be right, or you can be fast. Therefore you must use utf8_unicode_ci, because if you don’t care about correctness, then it’s trivial to make it infinitely fast. –  tchrist Mar 15 '12 at 19:24
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+1, Thank you for your follow-up edit! –  Francisco Presencia Dec 25 '12 at 3:13
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“utf8_general_ci comes very close to correct Unicode sorting in many languages, but has a number of inaccuracies in some languages.”: is there also an impact on character classes, I mean in practice, does it impact things like LTRIM/RTRIM? –  Hibou57 Aug 18 '13 at 13:57

I wanted to know what is the performance difference between using utf8_general_ci and utf8_unicode_ci, but I did not found any benchmarks in the Internet, so I decided to made benchmarks myself.

I created a very simple table with 500000 rows:

CREATE TABLE test(
  ID INT(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  Description VARCHAR(20) DEFAULT NULL
)
ENGINE = INNODB
CHARACTER SET utf8
COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

Then I filled it with random data by running this stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE randomizer()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;
  DECLARE random CHAR(20) ;

  theloop: loop
    SET random = CONV(FLOOR(RAND() * 99999999999999), 20, 36);

    INSERT INTO test VALUES (i+1, random);

    SET i=i+1;

    IF i = 500000 THEN
      LEAVE theloop;
    END IF;

  END LOOP theloop;
END

Then I created the following stored procedures to benchmark simple SELECT, SELECT with LIKE, and sorting (SELECT with ORDER BY):

CREATE benchmark_simple_select()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;

  theloop: loop

    SELECT * FROM test WHERE Description = 'test' COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

    SET i = i + 1;

    IF i = 30 THEN
      LEAVE theloop;
      END IF;

  END LOOP theloop;

END

CREATE PROCEDURE benchmark_select_like()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;

  theloop: loop

    SELECT * FROM test WHERE Description LIKE '%test' COLLATE utf8_general_ci;

    SET i = i + 1;

    IF i = 30 THEN
      LEAVE theloop;
      END IF;

  END LOOP theloop;

END

CREATE PROCEDURE benchmark_order_by()
BEGIN
  DECLARE i INT DEFAULT 0;

  theloop: loop

    SELECT * FROM test WHERE ID > FLOOR(1 + RAND() * (400000 - 1)) ORDER BY Description COLLATE utf8_general_ci LIMIT 1000;

    SET i = i + 1;

    IF i = 10 THEN
      LEAVE theloop;
      END IF;

  END LOOP theloop;

END

In the stored procedures above utf8_general_ci collation is used, but of course during the tests I used both utf8_general_ci and utf8_unicode_ci.

I called each stored procedure 5 times for each collation (5 times for utf8_general_ci and 5 times for utf8_unicode_ci) and then calculated the average values.

Here is the results:

benchmark_simple_select() with utf8_general_ci: 9957 ms
benchmark_simple_select() with utf8_unicode_ci: 10271 ms
In this benchmark using utf8_unicode_ci is slower than utf8_general_ci by 3.2%.

benchmark_select_like() with utf8_general_ci: 11441 ms
benchmark_select_like() with utf8_unicode_ci: 12811 ms
In this benchmark using utf8_unicode_ci is slower than utf8_general_ci by 12%.

benchmark_order_by() with utf8_general_ci: 11944 ms
benchmark_order_by() with utf8_unicode_ci: 12887 ms
In this benchmark using utf8_unicode_ci is slower than utf8_general_ci by 7.9%.

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Nice benchmark, thanks for sharing. I'm getting sensibly similar figures (MySQL v5.6.12 on Windows): 10%, 4%, 8%. I concur: the performance gain of utf8_general_ci is just too minimal to be worth using. –  RandomSeed Sep 15 '13 at 12:58

This post describes it very nicely.

In short: utf8_unicode_ci uses the Unicode Collation Algorithm as defined in the Unicode standards, whereas utf8_general_ci is a more simple sort order which results in "less accurate" sorting results.

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thanks. that was my impression. i'll take the performance hit :) –  onassar Jan 1 '10 at 1:51
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If you don’t care about correctness, then it’s trivial to make any algorithm infinitely fast. Just use utf8_unicode_ci and pretend the other one doesn’t exist. –  tchrist Mar 15 '12 at 19:26

See the mysql manual, Unicode Character Sets section:

For any Unicode character set, operations performed using the _general_ci collation are faster than those for the _unicode_ci collation. For example, comparisons for the utf8_general_ci collation are faster, but slightly less correct, than comparisons for utf8_unicode_ci. The reason for this is that utf8_unicode_ci supports mappings such as expansions; that is, when one character compares as equal to combinations of other characters. For example, in German and some other languages “ß” is equal to “ss”. utf8_unicode_ci also supports contractions and ignorable characters. utf8_general_ci is a legacy collation that does not support expansions, contractions, or ignorable characters. It can make only one-to-one comparisons between characters.

So to summarize, utf_general_ci uses a smaller and less correct (according to the standard) set of comparisons than utf_unicode_ci which should implement the entire standard. The general_ci set will be faster because there is less computation to do.

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8  
There is no such thing as “slightly less correct”. Correctness is a boolean characteristic; it does not admit modifiers of degree. Just use utf8_unicode_ci and pretend the buggy broken version doesn’t exist. –  tchrist Mar 15 '12 at 19:27
    
I had problems getting 5.6.15 to take the collation_connection setting, and it turns out you have to pass it in the SET line like 'SET NAMES utf8mb4 COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_ci'. Credit goes to Mathias Bynens for the solution, here's his very useful guide: mathiasbynens.be/notes/mysql-utf8mb4 –  Steve Hibbert Jan 26 at 14:57

There are charts to collate chars: http://collation-charts.org/mysql60/mysql604.utf8_general_ci.european.html and http://collation-charts.org/mysql60/mysql604.utf8_unicode_ci.european.html .

For saving values like 'é' and 'e' in unique column you should set up its collation to 'ut8_bin' to avoid duplicate error.

I don't see really benefits from using 'utf8_unicode_ci' in everyday use.

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