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On this page: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.addEventListener

It is warned that the value of this will be different when calling the modifyText() function when using addEventListener() as opposed to applying the event using onclick='' directly in the HTML. In the page linked above, note the first example (actually it's the second), and then the following section titled 'The value of this within the handler'.

I decided to test this, but cannot find a difference. What am I doing wrong?

addeventlistener2.html:

<html>
<head>
<title>DOM Event Example 1</title>
<style type="text/css">
  #t { border: 1px solid red }
  #t1 { background-color: pink; }
</style>
<script type="text/javascript">

  // Function to change the content of t2
  function modifyText(new_text) {
    var t2 = document.getElementById("t2");
    t2.innerHTML = new_text + '<br />this: <b>' + this + '</b>';
  }

  // Function to add event listener to t
  function load() {
    var el = document.getElementById("t");
    el.addEventListener("click", function(){modifyText("body onload")}, false);
  }

</script>
</head>
<body onload="load();">

<p>has onload in body.</p>

<table id="t">
  <tr><td id="t1">one</td></tr>
  <tr><td id="t2">two</td></tr>
</table>

</body>
</html>

addeventlistener2.html:

<html>
<head>
<title>DOM Event Example 2</title>
<style type="text/css">
  #t { border: 1px solid red }
  #t1 { background-color: pink; }
</style>
<script type="text/javascript">

  // Function to change the content of t2
  function modifyText(new_text) {
    var t2 = document.getElementById("t2");
    t2.innerHTML = new_text + '<br />this: <b>' + this + '</b>';
  }

</script>
</head>
<body>

<p>has onclick in table:</p>

<table id="t" onclick='modifyText("boo!")'>
  <tr><td id="t1">one</td></tr>
  <tr><td id="t2">two</td></tr>
</table>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
How can you expect to find a difference in the value of the this reference if you never even access it in either case? – Platinum Azure Oct 5 '11 at 22:17
1  
I put this into t2.innerHTML. – user965641 Oct 5 '11 at 22:18
    
It should be clear from the example already. You pass an anonymous function which calls modifyText, whereas in the documentation, they pass modifyText directly to addEventListener. – Felix Kling Oct 5 '11 at 22:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the addEventListener example you are wrapping modifyText inside an other function. All the this magic will happen to that outer function and modifyText won't see any of it.

Try passing modifyText directly to addEventListener

node.addEventListener('click', modifyText);
//and make sure to change modifyText to receive no parameters or it wont work :) 

Or use the power of closures if you still want to be able to choose the parameter:

function modifyText(new_text) {
    return function(){
        var t2 = document.getElementById("t2");
        t2.innerHTML = new_text + '<br />this: <b>' + this + '</b>';
    };
}

//addEventListener(modifyText('txt'))
//versus
//onclick=modifyText('txt')()
share|improve this answer
    
Right you are. It works when using the function reference. But I couldn't get the second "closures" sample to work at all. No error, either. – user965641 Oct 5 '11 at 22:58
    
Did you change the commented stuff to the propper version? I think I typed the closure bit correctly at least... – hugomg Oct 6 '11 at 2:51

Hej this referce to the object witch the function is stored. so in both your examples this refers to window the global object.

test:

t2.innerHTML = new_text + '<br />this: <b>' + (this === window) + '</b>';

will write true

share|improve this answer
    
this is set according to how a function is called, not according where a function is "stored". Functions bound to events with addEventListener will have this set to the element the event was triggered on. – nnnnnn Oct 5 '11 at 23:00
    
but it has the same result ... if you pass it to addEventListener then it is put in another context. Yea ofc its dependents on how its called. – megakorre Oct 5 '11 at 23:05
    
Well it has the same result in OP's code because the function bound by addEventListener immediately calls another function and doesn't set this for that function. – nnnnnn Oct 5 '11 at 23:12

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