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Instead of just the lowest set bit, I want to find the position of the nth lowest set bit. (I'm NOT talking about value on the nth bit position)

For example, say I have:
0000 1101 1000 0100 1100 1000 1010 0000

And I want to find the 4th bit that is set. Then I want it to return:
0000 0000 0000 0000 0100 0000 0000 0000

If popcnt(v) < n, it would make sense if this function returned 0, but any behavior for this case is acceptable for me.

I'm looking for something faster than a loop if possible.

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Are you asking for a general method which can be applied to give you a way to calculate the nth lowest bit for any constant n, or do you need it to work for any n given at runtime? Based on the mask-reduce pattern of these kind of hacks, I seriously doubt there's an elegant way to do the latter without a looping construct. –  Brian Gordon Oct 6 '11 at 0:15
1  
Yeah, you supply both v and n at runtime. I also couldn't think of any way to do it without looping. It is hard to divide up the problem, but I'm not convinced it's impossible to beat a loop. –  VoidStar Oct 6 '11 at 0:21
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It turns out that it is indeed possible to do this with no loops. It is fastest to precompute the (at least) 8 bit version of this problem. Of course, these tables use up cache space, but there should still be a net speedup in virtually all modern pc scenarios. In this code, n=0 returns the least set bit, n=1 is second-to-least, etc.

Solution with __popcnt

There is a solution using the __popcnt intrinsic (you need __popcnt to be extremely fast or any perf gains over a simple loop solution will be moot. Fortunately most SSE4+ era processors support it).

// lookup table for sub-problem: 8-bit v
byte PRECOMP[256][8] = { .... } // PRECOMP[v][n] for v < 256 and n < 8

ulong nthSetBit(ulong v, ulong n) {
    ulong p = __popcnt(v & 0xFFFF);
    ulong shift = 0;
    if (p <= n) {
        v >>= 16;
        shift += 16;
        n -= p;
    }
    p = __popcnt(v & 0xFF);
    if (p <= n) {
        shift += 8;
        v >>= 8;
        n -= p;
    }

    if (n >= 8) return 0; // optional safety, in case n > # of set bits
    return PRECOMP[v & 0xFF][n] << shift;
}

This illustrates how the divide and conquer approach works.

General Solution

There is also a solution for "general" architectures- without __popcnt. It can be done by processing in 8-bit chunks. You need one more lookup table that tells you the popcnt of a byte:

byte PRECOMP[256][8] = { .... } // PRECOMP[v][n] for v<256 and n < 8
byte POPCNT[256] = { ... } // POPCNT[v] is the number of set bits in v. (v < 256)

ulong nthSetBit(ulong v, ulong n) {
    ulong p = POPCNT[v & 0xFF];
    ulong shift = 0;
    if (p <= n) {
        n -= p;
        v >>= 8;
        shift += 8;
        p = POPCNT[v & 0xFF];
        if (p <= n) {
            n -= p;
            shift += 8;
            v >>= 8;
            p = POPCNT[v & 0xFF];
            if (p <= n) {
                n -= p;
                shift += 8;
                v >>= 8;
            }
        }
    }

    if (n >= 8) return 0; // optional safety, in case n > # of set bits
    return PRECOMP[v & 0xFF][n] << shift;
}

This could, of course, be done with a loop, but the unrolled form is faster and the unusual form of the loop would make it unlikely that the compiler could automatically unroll it for you.

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Well done! Do you feel like posting some runtime statistics of the different methods in this thread? –  Thomas Ahle Apr 5 at 15:46
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def bitN (l: Long, i: Int) : Long = {
  def bitI (l: Long, i: Int) : Long = 
    if (i == 0) 1L else 
    2 * { 
      if (l % 2 == 0) bitI (l / 2, i) else bitI (l /2, i-1) 
    }
  bitI (l, i) / 2
}

A recursive method (in scala). Decrement i, the position, if a modulo2 is 1. While returning, multiply by 2. Since the multiplication is invoced as last operation, it is not tail recursive, but since Longs are of known size in advance, the maximum stack is not too big.

scala> n.toBinaryString.replaceAll ("(.{8})", "$1 ")
res117: java.lang.String = 10110011 11101110 01011110 01111110 00111101 11100101 11101011 011000

scala> bitN (n, 40) .toBinaryString.replaceAll ("(.{8})", "$1 ")
res118: java.lang.String = 10000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 000000
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v-1 has a zero where v has its least significant "one" bit, while all more significant bits are the same. This leads to the following function:

int ffsn(unsigned int v, int n) {
   for (int i=0; i<n-1; i++) {
      v &= v-1; // remove the least significant bit
   }
   return v & ~(v-1); // extract the least significant bit
}
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Bit Twiddling Hacks

edit: there isn't a specific answer to this problem, but there are all the buildign blocks needed to solve it.

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I cant see a method without a loop, what springs to mind would be;

int set = 0;
int pos = 0;
while(set < n) {
   if((bits & 0x01) == 1) set++;
   bits = bits >> 1;
   pos++;
}

after which, pos would hold the position of the nth lowest-value set bit.

The only other thing that I can think of would be a divide and conquer approach, which might yield O(log(n)) rather than O(n)...but probably not.

Edit: you said any behaviour, so non-termination is ok, right? :P

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