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I realize that the synchronized block provided in Java is basically an implementation of a re-entrant mutex. However is the synchronized block atomic?

So how are interrupts handled for threads currently executing within the synchronized block - does it simply release the lock by reverting all the changes made so far?

EDIT: With regards to the Interrupts part of the question - how is it generally handled in Java. For instance, I see many java code examples wherein developers catch an interrupt when (say) a thread is in the wait queue. However within the catch block all they do is print that an interrupt has been raised. I am more curious as to what actually happens to that thread? Is it removed from the wait queue?

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3 Answers 3

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-- atomicity

Synchronized blocks help to implement atomicity - but their data operations can't be garaunteed to be atomic. To make the stuff in a synchronized block atomic, you use often use atomic data structures like getters and setters, for example, AtomicBoolean.

There are a cornucopia of great atomic classes, like atomic int arrays, supported by the latest java version.

-- how interrupts are handled :

Interrupts are not explicitly handled by synchronization - synchronous blocks only gaurantee that, while executing, the block cannot be reentered by another thread.

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However is the synchronized block atomic?

Yes, a synchronized block enforces that this block and any block that is synchronized on the same Object are atomic.

How interrupts are handled:

Interrupts are completely different to synchronization in Java. Each Thread has an interruptedStatus flag that is set whenever you call interrupt() on the Thread. Methods such as Thread.sleep() throw an InterruptedException if the interrupt flag is set and halt their sleeping.

Note that Thread.sleep() does not relinquish any locks during the sleep period. The lock associated with a synchronized block is only released when the execution flows out of the block.

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So basically it is upto a programmer to catch the Interrupt event and relinquish the lock in case its inside the synchronized block ? –  Hari Oct 6 '11 at 5:58
    
@Titan The synchronized block is more equivalent to a scoped lock, so relinquishing the lock is done simply by leaving that scope. Note that interrupt events are simply a mechanism for low level Thread control - while they might be used at similar times they are orthogonal concepts. –  Bringer128 Oct 6 '11 at 7:04

So basically it is upto a programmer to catch the Interrupt event and relinquish the lock in case its inside the synchronized block ?

You do not have to handle the lock. As written in the JLS 14.18 The synchronized Statement:

If execution of the Block completes normally, then the lock is unlocked and the synchronized statement completes normally. If execution of the Block completes abruptly for any reason, then the lock is unlocked and the synchronized statement then completes abruptly for the same reason.

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