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Is there any way to tell the C# compiler that a function never returns? I'm running into the following problem. This is a boiled down version for simplicity.

public int myMethod()
{
    try
    {
        return anythingHere();
    }
    catch
    {
        Environment.Exit(1); //or a function which always either calls Environment.Exit or throws an exception
    }
}

'package.class.myMethod()' not all code paths return a value.

If not, is there a general way to frame this sort of thing other than inserting unreachable code? Having a 'return 0' or somesuch after the Exit just seems ridiculous to me. As far as I know there is no way that a function can return from an Environment.Exit call, so no return value is needed if that branch is taken (if it threw an exception the function still wouldn't need to have returned a value).

EDIT:

Maybe something like this?

public T MyExit<T>()
{
    Environment.Exit(1);
    return default(T);
}

Still not entirely satisfactory though.

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2  
I don't really see the harm in putting the return in if it's never going to get hit, hopefully the compiler sees that but that might be in the optimization pass of compilation –  Jesus Ramos Oct 6 '11 at 1:31
1  
Jesus and SLak's are both correct, but my concern is, if this is a problem you're trying to solve by this fashion, perhaps its your architecture that needs a bit of a rethink. A method designed to return something should always return something; if it doesn't then I think your exit logic is in the wrong place ... if you see what I mean. the Top most caller should decide if you need to Exit or not. not a function call. –  Russ C Oct 6 '11 at 1:37
    
@RussC a valid concern. In my particular case, executing the catch block is an unrecoverable error which i want to note, but then ultimately exit the program. –  Buttons Oct 6 '11 at 1:40
    
Then perhaps the Catch should return a constant error value, or perhaps throw an exception that can ultimately be caught at your error handling layer ? Of course, I don't know how complex your project is so that might be total overkill :) –  Russ C Oct 6 '11 at 1:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It might be better to throw an exception than to call Environment.Exit. If someone else used your class, and their process suddenly shut down, they'd be pretty surprised. By throwing an exception you can at least explain why the problem happened.

At the top level entry point of your app (i.e., Main) you could then set up a global exception handler (AppDomain.UnhandledException) that handles all exceptions and calls Environment.Exit.

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this is what I ended up doing. There's no reason for my program to continue because it means that my data was invalid, but its more readable to throw exceptions then catch them and die at a higher level. Also as you mentioned if I use in the future I won't have to do back and get rid of these killswitches if I don't want them anymore. –  Buttons Oct 7 '11 at 17:56

C# does not support this.

In fact, it is impossible to do this in the general case.

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ah yes, the halting problem. In my case though its trivially decidable. –  Buttons Oct 6 '11 at 1:41

Make the method void, and pass in an object that contains the 'anythingHere' type of information you need as an out type, so that it can be set, but the method itself won't actually return anything.

public void myMethod(out anythingObject)
{
    try
    {
        anything = new anythingObject(stuff goes here); 
    }
    catch
    {
        Environment.Exit(1); //or a function which always either calls Environment.Exit or throws an exception
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
this gives me 'the out parameter 'variableName' must be assigned to before control leaves the current method'. Its a step in the right direction though. I guess I can set it to default on the first line of the method. –  Buttons Oct 6 '11 at 1:43
    
That makes the method much more annoying to use. It also won't help. –  SLaks Oct 6 '11 at 1:43
    
@Mike: How is that different from adding a return? –  SLaks Oct 6 '11 at 1:44
    
@SLaks It's an expedient. I don't see how it's much more annoying to use. Maybe just more annoying to use. BTw +1 for your answer, interesting to know the answer in that much detail –  Ralph Lavelle Oct 6 '11 at 2:08
    
@SLaks if for instance I added 'return 0' under Environment.Exit(1) in the original code, then it raises questions like 'why 0?' and 'wont this code never be reached?' for someone else looking at it. I think the parameterized exit is slightly more readable, but still crappy –  Buttons Oct 6 '11 at 2:29

I'm not sure if it's what you're looking for, but this would avoid unreachable code:

public int myMethod()
{
  int retVal = 0;
  try {
    retVal = anythingHere();
  } catch {
    Environment.Exit(1);
  }
  return retVal;
}
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Make it a void, instead of an int.

public void myMethod(out int i)
{
    try
    {
       i = anythingHere();
    }
    catch
    {
        Environment.Exit(1);
    }
}
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