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Assume we have the following arrays:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

and

b = [2, 3]

How can I subtract b from a? So that we have c = a - b which should be equal to [1, 4, 5]. jQuery solution would also be fine.

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3 Answers 3

Assuming you're on a browser that has Array.prototype.filter and Array.prototype.indexOf, you could use this:

var c = a.filter(function(item) {
    return b.indexOf(item) === -1;
});

If the browser in question does not have those methods, you may be able to shim them.

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2  
Live demo: jsfiddle.net/29Fpu –  Šime Vidas Oct 6 '11 at 1:46
1  
Btw IE8 is the only relevant browser on the market that doesn't implement those methods... Source: kangax.github.com/es5-compat-table –  Šime Vidas Oct 6 '11 at 1:48
    
google chrome too doesn't implements the .forEach method... –  Kakashi Oct 6 '11 at 1:49
    
@Kakashi: It does for me. What version are you using? –  icktoofay Oct 6 '11 at 1:50
    
Note that the links above contain shims for filter and indexOf. –  Grinn Sep 16 '13 at 19:01

For code that would work in all browsers, you would have to manually find each element from b in a and remove it.

var a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
var b = [2, 3];

var result = [], found;
for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
    found = false;
    // find a[i] in b
    for (var j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
        if (a[i] == b[j]) {
            found = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (!found) {
        result.push(a[i]);
    }
}
// The array result now contains just the items from a that are not in b

Working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/xkBzR/

And, here's a version that could be faster for large arrays because it puts everything into an object for hashed lookups rather than brute force array searching:

var a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
var b = [2, 3];

function filterArray(src, filt) {
    var temp = {}, i, result = [];
    // load contents of filt into object keys for faster lookup
    for (i = 0; i < filt.length; i++) {
        temp[filt[i]] = true;
    }

    // go through src
    for (i = 0; i < src.length; i++) {
        if (!(src[i] in temp)) {
            result.push(src[i]);
        }
    }
    return(result);
}

var filtered = filterArray(a, b);

Working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/LUcx6/

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why do not implement Array.filter method? may be useful in other cases too. –  Kakashi Oct 6 '11 at 1:52
    
Array.filter() is useful - I'm just providing an alternative. Some people don't want to add methods to existing core objects or they have code that might break if that was done. –  jfriend00 Oct 6 '11 at 2:00

Here an implementation for try works in all browsers:

if('filter' in Array == false) {
    Array.prototype.filter = 
        function(callback) {
            if(null == this || void 0 == this) {
                return;
             }
            var filtered = [];
            for(i = 0, len = this.length; i < len; i++) {
                    var tmp = this[i];
                    if(callback(tmp)) {
                        filtered.push(tmp);
                     }
             }
                return filtered;
       }
  }

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]; 
b = [2, 3]; 

var c = a.filter(function(item) { /*implementation of icktoofay */
    return b.indexOf(item) === -1;
});
share|improve this answer
    
Array.indexOf does not exist in all browsers either (not in any version of IE before IE9, for example.) –  jfriend00 Oct 6 '11 at 2:25

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