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When you use a ThreadLocal<T> and T implements IDisposable, how are you supposed to dispose of the members being held inside of the ThreadLocal?

Occording to ILSpy The Dispose(), and Dispose(bool) methods of ThreadLocal are

public void Dispose()
{
    this.Dispose(true);
    GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
}

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    int currentInstanceIndex = this.m_currentInstanceIndex;
    if (currentInstanceIndex > -1 && Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref this.m_currentInstanceIndex, -1, currentInstanceIndex) == currentInstanceIndex)
    {
        ThreadLocal<T>.s_availableIndices.Push(currentInstanceIndex);
    }
    this.m_holder = null;
}

It does not appear that ThreadLocal attempts to call Dispose on it's child members. I can't tell how to reference each thread it internally has allocated so I can take care of it.


I ran a test with the following code, the class is never disposed

static class Sandbox
{
    static void Main()
    {

        ThreadLocal<TestClass> test = new ThreadLocal<TestClass>();
        test.Value = new TestClass();

        test.Dispose();
        Console.Read();
    }
}

class TestClass : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    protected void Dispose(bool Disposing)
    {
        Console.Write("I was disposed!");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Dispose method is just like a normal method. Once you call test.Dispose() in your example it must execute the Dispose method in the TestClass. If not, that's strange. BTW, IDisposable implementation is not correct. Look at here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1yfkh5e.aspx –  CharithJ Oct 6 '11 at 2:53
1  
Note that that pattern is only required if your class has unmanaged resources. Otherwise don't add finalizers as they add overhead on class creation and on finalizing. –  FuleSnabel Oct 6 '11 at 5:27
    
In .Net 4.5, you can tell the ThreadLocal to track all Values, which makes it easy to dispose them manually: New in .NET 4.5: ThreadLocal.Values –  Sphinxxx Apr 29 at 1:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I had a look at the code in ThreadLocal<T> to see what the current Dispose is doing and it appears to be a lot of voodoo. Obviously disposing of thread-related stuff.

But it doesn't dispose of the values if T itself is disposable.

Now, I have a solution - a ThreadLocalDisposables<T> class, but before I give the full definition it's worth thinking about what should happen if you wrote this code:

var tl = new ThreadLocalDisposables<IExpensiveDisposableResource>();
tl.Value = myEdr1;
tl.Value = myEdr2;
tl.Dispose();

Should both myEdr1 & myEdr2 both be disposed? Or just myEdr2? Or should myEdr1 be disposed when myEdr2 was assigned?

It's not clear to me what the semantics should be.

It is clear to me, however, that if I wrote this code:

var tl = new ThreadLocalDisposables<IExpensiveDisposableResource>(
    () => new ExpensiveDisposableResource());
tl.Value.DoSomething();
tl.Dispose();

Then I would expect that the resource created by the factory for each thread should be disposed of.

So I'm not going to allow the direct assignment of the disposable value for ThreadLocalDisposables and only allow the factory constructor.

Here's ThreadLocalDisposables:

public class ThreadLocalDisposables<T> : IDisposable
    where T : IDisposable
{
    private ThreadLocal<T> _threadLocal = null;
    private ConcurrentBag<T> _values = new ConcurrentBag<T>();

    public ThreadLocalDisposables(Func<T> valueFactory)
    {
        _threadLocal = new ThreadLocal<T>(() =>
        {
            var value = valueFactory();
            _values.Add(value);
            return value;
        });
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _threadLocal.Dispose();
        Array.ForEach(_values.ToArray(), t => t.Dispose());
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _threadLocal.ToString();
    }

    public bool IsValueCreated
    {
        get { return _threadLocal.IsValueCreated; }
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get { return _threadLocal.Value; }
    }
}

Does this help?

share|improve this answer
    
Yea, that is what I was figuring that I was going to need to do anyway. I just wanted to wait before I posted my own answer. –  Scott Chamberlain Oct 6 '11 at 6:50

In .NET 4.5 the Values property was added to ThreadLocal<> to deal with the problem of manually managing the lifetime of TheadLocal objects. It returns a list of all current instances bound to that ThreadLocal variable.

An example using a Parallel.For loop accessing a ThreadLocal database connection pool was presented in this MSDN article. The relevant code snippet is below.

var threadDbConn = new ThreadLocal<MyDbConnection>(() => MyDbConnection.Open(), true);
try
{
    Parallel.For(0, 10000, i =>
    {
        var inputData = threadDbConn.Value.GetData(i);
        ...
    });
}
finally
{
    foreach(var dbConn in threadDbConn.Values)
    {
        dbConn.Close();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

How is the ThreadLocal.Dispose method itself getting called? I would expect that it would most likely be within something like a "using" block. I would suggest that one wrap the "using" block for the ThreadLocal with a "using" block for the resource that's going to be stored there.

share|improve this answer

This is related to ThreadLocal<> and memory leak

My guess is because there is no IDisposable constraint on T, it is assumed that the user of ThreadLocal<T> will dispose of the local object, when appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
It cannot have IDisposable constraint on T because otherwise you cannot declare ThreadLocal<int>? –  UserControl Apr 29 '13 at 7:44
    
Exactly. ThreadLocal<> is designed to be used with any type, so it wouldn't make sense to put the IDisposable constraint. –  Igor Pashchuk Apr 30 '13 at 16:02

Normally when you don't explicitly dispose of a class that holds a managed resource, the garbage collector will eventually run and dispose of it. For this to happen, the class has to have a finalizer that disposes of its resource. Your sample class doesn't have a finalizer.

Now, to dispose of a class that's held inside a ThreadLocal<T> where T is IDisposable you also have to do it yourself. ThreadLocal<T> is just a wrapper, it won't attempt to guess what's the correct behavior for its wrapped reference when it is itself disposed. The class could, e.g., survive its thread local storage.

share|improve this answer
    
So what should be done when you use a ThreadLocal when the object implements IDisposeable and it is not a simple case like my example, "just let the finailizer take care of it"? That seems wrong to me. Also, if I had a easy way to track the object's lifetime so I could call Dispose by hand I would not be using ThreadLocal, I would just track it directly. –  Scott Chamberlain Oct 6 '11 at 3:25
1  
@ScottChamberlain - It's a bad idea to let the finalizer take care of it. There is no guarantee that the finalizer will ever run. And you must explicitly dispose of your objects in your code. You probably need to wrap ThreadLocal<T> to get what you need. –  Enigmativity Oct 6 '11 at 5:36

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