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How do I find the upper and lower critical values of an F-test: var.test(x,y)

Example from my text:

x <- c (1973, 403, 509, 2103, 1153  292, 1916, 1602, 1559, 547, 801, 359)

y <- c (1185, 885, 2955, 815, 2852, 1217, 1762, 2592, 1632)

var.test(x,y, alternative = c("two.sided"),  conf.level = 0.95)

 F test to compare two variances

data:  x and y

F = 0.6908, num df = 11, denom df = 8, p-value = 0.5572

alternative hypothesis: true ratio of variances is not equal to 1 

95 percent confidence interval:

 0.1628029 2.5311116 

sample estimates:

ratio of variances 

         0.6908397 

Book says that the critical values are F < 0.273 and F > 4.30

Seems like R says F < 0.1628029 and F > 2.5311116

Any ideas on this one?

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2  
The confidence interval is different notion from the critical value, so no wander if they are different. –  kohske Oct 6 '11 at 2:50
    
so any comment on how to find them? –  Travis Oct 6 '11 at 2:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The 95% confidence interval is on the ratio of the variances, not on the F statistic. Here's the F statistic calculation:

> qf(c(0.025,0.975),11,8)
[1] 0.2729392 4.2434128

which agrees with your table.

If we look inside stats:::var.test.default we find

   BETA <- (1 - conf.level)/2
   CINT <- c(ESTIMATE/qf(1 - BETA, DF.x, DF.y), ESTIMATE/qf(BETA, 
            DF.x, DF.y))

The second line could actually be written slightly more simply as ESTIMATE/qf(c(1-BETA,BETA),DF.x,DF.y), but I'm not sure this kind of trivial code cleanup is worth the effort of suggesting to R-core ...

Doing this calculation with conf.level equal to 0.95, the variance ratio estimate from above, and the quantiles we computed above matches up:

> 0.6908397/c(0.273,4.30)
[1] 2.5305484 0.1606604
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