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I have two tables, Cars and Drivers, that are joined by a third table, CarDrivers, in a many-to-many relationship.

My UI allows the user to check any number of drivers associated with the current car. Each check indicates that a row should be entered into the CarDrivers table.

My question is: what's the most efficient way to update those rows when the user submits the form?

I need to go through and add a row into CarDrivers for each item that was checked and delete one for each item that was unchecked, while leaving those that have not changed.

The only way I see is to go through each combination, one at a time, and add those that don't already exist or remove those that need to be removed. Is there a slicker way?

I can use Entity Frameworks 4, ADO.NET, straight SQL queries or stored procedures.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is exactly the scenario the MERGE syntax was invented to handle, notably the WHEN NOT MATCHED BY SOURCE clause.

Broadly speaking, put the current state values into a staging table then using MERGE to handle the INSERT and DELETE actions in one hit.

Here's a brief sketch:

CREATE TABLE Cars (VIN INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE);

CREATE TABLE Drivers (driver_licence_number INTEGER NOT NULL UNIQUE);

CREATE TABLE CarDrivers 
(
 VIN INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES Cars (VIN), 
 driver_licence_number INTEGER NOT NULL 
    REFERENCES Drivers (driver_licence_number)
);

INSERT INTO Cars VALUES (1), (2), (3);
INSERT INTO Drivers VALUES (22), (55), (99);

INSERT INTO CarDrivers VALUES (1, 22), (1, 55);

CREATE TABLE CarDrivers_staging
(
 VIN INTEGER NOT NULL REFERENCES Cars (VIN), 
 driver_licence_number INTEGER NOT NULL 
    REFERENCES Drivers (driver_licence_number)
);

INSERT INTO CarDrivers_staging 
   VALUES (1, 55), -- remains
          (1, 99); -- insert
                   -- DELETE (1, 22)

MERGE INTO CarDrivers
   USING CarDrivers_staging S 
      ON S.VIN = CarDrivers.VIN
         AND S.driver_licence_number = CarDrivers.driver_licence_number 
WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
   INSERT (VIN, driver_licence_number)
      VALUES (VIN, driver_licence_number)
WHEN NOT MATCHED BY SOURCE THEN
   DELETE;
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Thanks. I'll have to spend some time on that later today to see if I can understand it. –  Jonathan Wood Oct 6 '11 at 14:32

I doubt this is more efficient, but "slicker", maybe, particularly if you don't have a huge amount of data. When a user submits a form that updates the cars-drivers relationships, why not first delete ALL relationships in CarDrivers related to them and then insert just the ones they checked? Alternatively, you could have a uniq constraint on both columns in CarDrivers, and then just worry about inserting and deleting, rather than checking for existing records in your code.

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I thought about deleting them all first but that seems horribly inefficient to me. If, by unique constraint, you mean each column in CarDrivers is unique, that would prevent more than one driver being associated with the same car or more than one care being associated with the same driver. However, if you mean both columns combined is unique, that's the way I have it. But I still need to check existing records or else my app will get a database error. –  Jonathan Wood Oct 6 '11 at 4:03
    
Does the error force a rollback? Otherwise couldn't you just catch that particular error and move along? –  imm Oct 6 '11 at 4:06
1  
I think I would just get a general database exception that could mean any database error. In general, I like to write code that doesn't raise exceptions. –  Jonathan Wood Oct 6 '11 at 4:07
    
It could be worth comparing timing for delete/insert (with no unique constraint over both columns) vs. insert speed with the unique constraint. While it seems horribly inefficient to delete everything first and then do a number of inserts, it might actually be slower to have to check the unique constraint over the entire table every time an insert happens. –  imm Oct 6 '11 at 4:10

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