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What is the best way to simply wait for 24 hours +/- 1 second. I know that Threading.Sleep for a long time is not accurate and can vary based on the CPU loads.

I see the System.Timers.Timer allows you to create a timed event. How do I use this to simply wait for 24 hours?

private void myTest{
            // SET SOMETHING UP
            m_theTimer = new System.Timers.Timer();
            m_theTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OurTimerCallback);
            const int hrsToMs = 60 * 60 * 1000;
            m_theTimer.Interval = TestPeriodHours * hrsToMs;
            m_theTimer.Enabled = true;

            //---->want to wait for 24 hours<------
            // RESUME TEST HERE
            VerifySomething()

     }

public void OurTimerCallback(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Received a callback, the time is {0}", e.SignalTime);
    }
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Just create a timer that fires each second and checks if needed interval reached. –  zerkms Oct 6 '11 at 5:18
1  
The frustrating part is to test (and fix and retest again if neccesery (and again and again)). –  Dani Oct 6 '11 at 5:23
    
If you wait for 24 hours testing could be a pain, yes, but who would do that? –  Sascha Hennig Oct 6 '11 at 6:41
    
@Dani as if time really was on my side. –  kenny Oct 6 '11 at 6:42
    
This question starts off bad, Sleep() accuracy is most definitely not dependent on cpu load. No more or less than any other timer. They are accurate to 1/64 second, plus whatever time will be needed to page fault your code back into RAM. –  Hans Passant Oct 6 '11 at 7:28

5 Answers 5

Maybe Quartz.NET is what you are looking for. http://quartznet.sourceforge.net/.

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+1. Trying to solve that with in program solutions wont work and is - sorry - simplistic. 24 hours is a logn time. Server soemtimes need a reset. You need an external scheduling mechanism that writes the next runtime into a database and checks the database regularly. –  TomTom Oct 6 '11 at 6:34

+/- 1 second? I would use a hybrid approach.

Use task scheduler to start a program, in 23:58. Then have that program sleep for 2 minutes or less until the exact moment arrives, then perform the work.

If you don't care about the 1 second accuracy, you could just use task scheduler alone, on the 24 hour division.

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I don't need to schedule a task, but just wait for 24 hours from the program start time. –  mcintoda Oct 6 '11 at 5:25
    
The approach would be the same nevertheless. Start a timer that checks periodically, but in pretty big TimeSpans what the time is (lets just say once per minute). If you get close to your destination time start a timer with a higher resolution (once per second or even more often). +1 from me. –  Sascha Hennig Oct 6 '11 at 6:39

Assuming you are on win forms.

Declare a datetime variable and assign a value on form_load event. Create a timer and fire the the event in every second. Check the datetime variable in the timer event. if timespan is 1 hour, call your main method.

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I think you can use a combination of ManualResetEvent along with Timer.

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Maybe this is better if you really want to use a timer.

    private void myTest{
        // SET SOMETHING UP
        bool bTimer_Expired = true;
        m_theTimer = new System.Timers.Timer();
        m_theTimer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OurTimerCallback);
        const int hrsToMs = 60 * 60 * 1000;
        m_theTimer.Interval = TestPeriodHours * hrsToMs;
        m_theTimer.Enabled = true;

        //Wait for call back to set flag that the elapsed time has expired
        while(!bTimer_Expired)Sleep(1000);

        //---->want to wait for 24 hours<------
        // RESUME TEST HERE
        VerifySomething()

     public void OurTimerCallback(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
     {
     bTimer_Expired=true;
     Console.WriteLine("Received a callback, the time is {0}", e.SignalTime);
     }

But I'm a little fuzzy on why ManuelResetEvent doesn't do the job easier....

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