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Ok Guys please forgive my ignorance. I'm new to javascript so all help is well received. I've been trying to implement these solutions but it's not working. This is what I have on my revised code:

    <script type="text/javascript">
    jQuery.noConflict() // return `$` to it's previous "owner"
    (function($){ // in here you're assured that `$ == jQuery`
    $(document).ready(function(){  
    $('#slider1').tinycarousel()
    $('a.fancybox').fancybox()
    $('textarea, select').uniform()
    $('#slider').nivoSlider ({ pauseTime: 6000, effect: 'sliceDown'})
    })
    })(jQuery)
    </script>

When i do this it makes all of the above stop working.

Also, I still have the other statement

    function $(id) {
    return document.getElementById(id);
}

Which Im not sure if I understand what to do with it since if I take it off the element that goes with it stops working (it's a dual slider)

Thanks Again


I'm a javascript novice so my apologies :0)

I'm using this javascript on a website:

    <script type="text/javascript">        
    $(document).ready(function(){  
        $('#slider1').tinycarousel();
        $('a.fancybox').fancybox();
        $('textarea, select').uniform();
        $('#slider').nivoSlider ({ pauseTime: 6000, effect: 'sliceDown'});
    });
    </script>

There is another script that contains this at the beginning which is making everything else to stop working. As soon as I delete it everything works again. Is there a way to unite these? or do they need to stay separate?

    function $(id) {
        return document.getElementById(id);
    }

Thanks in advance...

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's good practice to "shield" your code from this kind of problem by never using the $ function directly, instead create a new scope where you explicitly define $ = jQuery:

jQuery.noConflict() // return `$` to it's previous "owner"
(function($){ // in here you're assured that `$ == jQuery`
    $(document).ready(function(){  
        $('#slider1').tinycarousel()
        $('a.fancybox').fancybox()
        $('textarea, select').uniform()
        $('#slider').nivoSlider ({ pauseTime: 6000, effect: 'sliceDown'})
    })
})(jQuery)

Alternatively, jQuery passes itself to the DOMReady short form:

jQuery.noConflict()

jQuery(function($){
        $('#slider1').tinycarousel()
        $('a.fancybox').fancybox()
        $('textarea, select').uniform()
        $('#slider').nivoSlider ({ pauseTime: 6000, effect: 'sliceDown'})
})

Make this a standard practice and you'll avoid the issue in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again everyone for all the answers They are really appreciated. –  Daniel Oct 6 '11 at 7:19

The problem is you have declared a function called $ which now overwrites the jquery reference that is created by jquery.

thus when you do $('#slider1').tinycarousel(); you are now expecting a method tinycarousel defined on the object returned by your function.

if you still want to continue using jquery and your function you will have to use

jQuery("something").tinycarousel()
share|improve this answer
    
also add $.noConflict(); as suggested by mu so that you explicitly remove the $ reference that query creates. –  Baz1nga Oct 6 '11 at 6:37

Use noConflict to release $ and the use jQuery() instead of $() for jQuery operations:

<script type="text/javascript" src="other_lib.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $.noConflict();
    // Now $('x') uses the custom $ function.
</script>
share|improve this answer

You should probably remove the second script because jQuery itself contains ID selector which will select elements from dom using id as requirement.

Remove this

function $(id) {
return document.getElementById(id);
}

Do this from now to select with ID

$(document).ready(function(){


$("#myCarousel").fadeIn();

});
share|improve this answer
    
That might render the entire second script useless though, and it might be as long and complicated as jQuery is for all we know. However, jQuery has the dollar-safe options (don't remember how it's done, but it's pretty simple). –  Alxandr Oct 6 '11 at 6:33
    
LOL ... why is his script overwriting JQuery? Anyway, this should fix the problem. If you are including the jquery in the header of your webpage (ie <script type="text/javascript" src="/path/to/jquery.js"></script>). –  Simon H Oct 6 '11 at 6:34
    
@Alxandr no point in reinventing the ID selector u agree? also jQuery would provide chainability. #script2 would not –  Deeptechtons Oct 6 '11 at 6:36
    
your not addressing the question you are giving a suggestion which could be in a comment. –  Baz1nga Oct 6 '11 at 6:37
1  
the function $(id) from script#2 returns a DOM element. jQuery's $(...) function returns a jQuery set object. These are not the same things, so you can't replace script#2's $ function with jQuery's $ function. –  Lee Oct 6 '11 at 6:47

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