Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var numbers = new[] {1, -1, -2, 3.5, 1.1, -0.1, 2, 5.7, 8, 9, -10, -2};

        Func<double, bool> positiveIntegerSelector = x =>
        {
            if(x < 0)
                return false;

            var temp = (int) x;
            return temp == x;
        };
        Func<double, bool> negativeIntegerSelector = x =>
        {
            if(x >= 0)
                return false;

            var temp = (int) x;
            return temp == x;
        };

        var positiveIntegers = numbers.Where(positiveIntegerSelector); //unable to step in
        var negativeIntegers = numbers.Where(negativeIntegerSelector);

        Console.WriteLine(String.Join(",", positiveIntegers.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray()));
        Console.WriteLine(String.Join("," , negativeIntegers.Select(x => x.ToString()).ToArray()));
    }
}

What am'i missing here ? (other than breakpoints)

pls note it debugs fine just fine otherwise except predicate in which i'm unable to step in.


edit

apologies for being an absolute jackass --> stepout shift + F11 (when predicate is specified as a method group / delegate)

step in works as usual when predicate is specified as a lambda expression x => positiveIntegerSelector (x) as one can then specify a break pt on the predicate in the lambda expression

share|improve this question
    
cheers mathew will do so –  kalki Oct 6 '11 at 7:06

2 Answers 2

You need to put a breakpoint into the predicate to debug it.
You can't "step into" (F11 on my machine) the predicate directly, because the code that invokes the predicate is not your code but the code that gets created inside Enumerable.Where, which will be executed as soon as you iterate the result. In your case, these are the lines with the String.Join call.
Long story short: It is .NET framework code that executes these predicates.

share|improve this answer
    
breakpoint does exist within the predicate, except that since i used a method group hence the need to step out, where as if used as lambda expression i was able to step in –  kalki Oct 6 '11 at 6:53
    
I don't see a method group in your code. –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 6 '11 at 6:54
    
i should framed the question more clearly, var positiveIntegers = numbers.Where(positiveIntegerSelector); –  kalki Oct 6 '11 at 7:05
1  
There is still no method groups here. You are using a delegate that has been created from a lambda expression. –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 6 '11 at 8:01
    
got it... thank you. –  kalki Oct 6 '11 at 8:50

When were you expecting to step into the predicate? Don't forget that when you call Where, that doesn't perform any filtering at the time - it just creates an object representing the filtered sequence. If you were expecting to be able to hit F11 on the Where call, you certainly wouldn't get to your predicate.

I've just tried this in Visual C# Express 2010, putting a break point on the first statement of each lambda expression, and it hit the breakpoints with no problem as it ran the predicates during the last two lines of the program. I would expect the same to be true for VS2008.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.