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namespace { int Foo (int a) ; }

Like this. Is this code snippet legal?

Is this legal? and, can I reference Foo in anywhere? or only certain domain?

Thank you.

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possible duplicate of Superiority of unnamed namespace over static? –  Nawaz Oct 6 '11 at 6:50
    
It is legal, but means something different than a regular namespace. :) –  jalf Oct 6 '11 at 6:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It is legal, You can use Foo anywhere in the same Translation Unit.

Anonymous namespace is the standard prescribed way of saying static on variables to limit their scope to the same Translation unit.

C++03 Standard section 7.3.1.1 Unnamed namespaces

para 2:

The use of the static keyword is deprecated when declaring objects in a namespace scope, the unnamed-namespace provides a superior alternative.


Update:
As @Matthieu M. correctly points out in the comments, and his answer The C++11 Standard removed the above quote from C++03 Standard, which implies that the static keyword is not deprecated when declaring objects in a namespace scope, Anonymous or Unnamed namespaces are still valid nevertheless.

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My answer is slightly different, but a little bit more correct I think ;) –  Björn Pollex Oct 6 '11 at 6:44
    
@BjörnPollex: Ah it was my second edit made our answers same lol –  Alok Save Oct 6 '11 at 6:45
    
And now we both added standard quotes :) –  Björn Pollex Oct 6 '11 at 6:47
    
@BjörnPollex: And then I added link to What is an Translation Unit :-) –  Alok Save Oct 6 '11 at 6:49
2  
@Als: your answer is, however, deprecated. In C++11, the commitee backed out and the use of the static keyword is no longer described as deprecated :) –  Matthieu M. Oct 6 '11 at 6:57

This is legal. You can reference Foo anywhere inside the translation-unit.

From the C++03-standard, Section 7.3.1.1:

An unnamed-namespace-definition behaves as if it were replaced by

namespace unique { /* empty body */ } using namespace unique;
namespace unique { namespace-body } 

where all occurrences of unique in a translation unit are replaced by the same identifier and this identifier differs from all other identifiers in the entire program.

The use of the static keyword is deprecated when declaring objects in a namespace scope; the unnamed-namespace provides a superior alternative.

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unnamed-namespace-definition behaves as if it were replaced by .... I beg to differ here. In case of unnamed namespace you can declare/define a variable inside it. However, in case of normal namespace you cannot (because it will cause multiple symbol linker error). So both doesn't have the same effect. –  iammilind Oct 6 '11 at 6:53
3  
@iammilind: Since unique (which is the name of that namespace) is different for all translation-units, you will never have multiply defined symbols. Also, this is a quote from the standard, so if you beg to differ, take it up with the committee ;) –  Björn Pollex Oct 6 '11 at 6:56
    
Ok, I thought unique is just a name. I din't know standard committee would put such confusing example :)). May be namespace <unique name> { ... } using namespace <unique name>; would have been appropriate wording. –  iammilind Oct 6 '11 at 6:59
    
@iammilind: the standard uses a different typeface to indicate that unique isn't literally part of the code; I guess they also assumed that people would read to the end of the sentence. –  Mike Seymour Oct 6 '11 at 10:34
    
@MikeSeymour, yup agreed. My mistake. And +1 to this answer. Thanks. –  iammilind Oct 7 '11 at 2:46

The definition changed slightly in the C++11 Standard:

7.3.1.1 Unnamed namespaces [namespace.unnamed]

1/ An unnamed-namespace-definition behaves as if it were replaced by

inlineoptnamespace unique { /* empty body */ }
using namespace unique ;
namespace unique { namespace-body }

where inline appears if and only if it appears in the unnamed-namespace-definition, all occurrences of unique in a translation unit are replaced by the same identifier, and this identifier differs from all other identifiers in the entire program.94 [ Example:

namespace { int i; } // unique ::i
void f() { i++; } // unique ::i++

namespace A {
  namespace {
    int i; // A:: unique ::i
    int j; // A:: unique ::j
  }
  void g() { i++; } // A:: unique ::i++
}

using namespace A;

void h() {
  i++; // error: unique ::i or A:: unique ::i
  A::i++; // A:: unique ::i
  j++; // A:: unique ::j
}

—end example ]

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