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I'm trying to explain to my team why this is bad practice, and am looking for an anti-pattern reference to help in my explanation. This is a very large enterprise app, so here's a simple example to illustrate what was implemented:

public void ControlStuff()
    {
        var listOfThings = LoadThings();
        var listOfThingsThatSupportX = new string[] {"ThingA","ThingB", "ThingC"};
        foreach (var thing in listOfThings)
        {
            if(listOfThingsThatSupportX.Contains(thing.Name))
            {
                DoSomething();
            }
        }
    }

I'm suggesting that we add a property to the 'Things' base class to tell us if it supports X, since the Thing subclass will need to implement the functionality in question. Something like this:

public void ControlStuff()
    {
        var listOfThings = LoadThings();
        foreach (var thing in listOfThings)
        {
            if (thing.SupportsX)
            {
                DoSomething();
            }
        }
    }
class ThingBase
{
    public virtual bool SupportsX { get { return false; } }
}
class ThingA : ThingBase
{
    public override bool SupportsX { get { return true; } }
}
class ThingB : ThingBase
{
}

So, it's pretty obvious why the first approach is bad practice, but what's this called? Also, is there a pattern better suited to this problem than the one I'm suggesting?

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59  
That's the anti-pattern known as crappy code. Seriously, it doesn't have to have been catalogued for it to be bad code. Likewise good code doesn't have to fit into a pre-determined set of good patterns. –  David Heffernan Oct 6 '11 at 7:17
28  
Depending on what X is, your suggestion may be as problematic as the hard-coded O(n^2) approach, but for different reasons. You're forcing knowledge of X into the base-class, and therefore into every derived class you create (whether it supports X or not). For types of Things where X has no relevance at all, the SupportsX() method is nothing but pollution in the public interface. If you have a lot of different features (SupportsY(), SupportsZ(), etc.), this pollution becomes extreme in a hurry. Consider a generic test Supports(X), or use interfaces to mark feature support. –  Lee Oct 6 '11 at 7:34
    
@DavidHeffernan Easily one of the best comments I've seen on SO in my short time here. –  WhozCraig Nov 1 '12 at 9:11
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14 Answers

up vote 74 down vote accepted

Normally a better approach (IMHO) would be to use interfaces instead of inheritance

then it is just a matter of checking whether the object has implemented the interface or not.

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1  
Agreed: the way the OP suggests means that you need to know about X in advance, and write SupportsX. This way you simply implement ISomething in derived classes and can do if (myObj is ISomething) to see if it supports it –  Kieren Johnstone Oct 6 '11 at 7:20
9  
I'm fully with you, neither of the OP's methods is very good to solve the problem. There should be an ISupportX interface that the respective "things" implement if they support it. Otherwise ThingBase and all derived Things become fat classes. That doesn't fit with the OO "separation of concern" principle. –  Andreas Oct 6 '11 at 7:53
4  
myObj is ISomething is a possible violation of Liskovs Substitution Principle. –  jgauffin Oct 6 '11 at 12:43
15  
checking whether the object has implemented the interface, rampant as it may be, is a bad thing. –  Miserable Variable Oct 6 '11 at 14:32
3  
@HemalPandya why is it a bad thing? –  wprl Oct 12 '11 at 4:59
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I think the anti-pattern name is hard-coding :)

Whether there should be a ThingBase.supportsX depends at least somewhat on what X is. In rare cases that knowledge might be in ControlStuff() only.

More usually though, X might be one of set of things in which case ThingBase might need to expose its capabilities using ThingBase.supports(ThingBaseProperty) or some such.

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IMO the fundamental design principle at play here is encapsulation. In your proposed solution you have encapsulated the logic inside of the Thing class, where as in the original code the logic leaks out into the callers.

It also violates the Open-Closed principle, since if you want to add new subclasses that support X you now need to go and modify anywhere that contains that hard-coded list. With your solution you just add the new class, override the method and you're done.

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Don't know about a name (doubt such exists) but think of each "Thing" as a car - some cars have Cruise Control system and others do not have.

Now you have fleet of cars you manage and want to know which have cruise control.

Using the first approach is like finding list of all car models which have cruise control, then go car by car and search for each in that list - if there it means the car has cruise control, otherwise it doesn't have. Cumbersome, right?

Using the second approach means that each car that has cruise control come with a sticker saying "I has cruise control" and you just have to look for that sticker, without relying on external source to bring you information.

Not very technical explanation, but simple and to the point.

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3  
The downside to the second approach is that all the cars have stickers saying whether they have cruise control or not, and that sticker is permanent. –  thedaian Oct 6 '11 at 14:01
    
@thedaian why is this a downside? Sticker can be removed (setting to false) easily. No sticker, no Cruise Control.. –  Shadow Wizard Oct 6 '11 at 14:02
3  
The sticker is still there, setting it to false just changes the text from "I has cruise control" to "I no has cruise control", the function for SupportsX is still there, no matter what. –  thedaian Oct 6 '11 at 14:07
    
@thedaian OK let's turn to programming for a second.. why having the property/function always there is a downside in your opinion? –  Shadow Wizard Oct 6 '11 at 14:10
1  
Other answers have covered why it's a downside, but basically: you're adding a bunch of extra functions to the class, some of which might only be used once or twice, the code for whether the object supports X is still hardcoded and spread across multiple files. A set of interfaces would be the better option here. –  thedaian Oct 6 '11 at 14:21
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There is a perfectly reasonable situation where this coding practice makes sense. It might not be an issue of which things actually support X (where of course an interface on each thing would be better), but rather which things that support X are ones that you want to enable. The label for what you see is then simply configuration, presently hard-coded, and the improvement on this is to move it eventually to a configuration file or otherwise. Before you persuade your team to change it I would check this is not the intention of the code you have paraphrased.

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The Writing Too Much Code Anti-Pattern. It makes it harder to read and understand.

As has been pointed out already it would be better to use an interface.

Basically the programmers are not taking advantage of Object-Oriented Principles and instead doing things using procedural code. Every time we reach for the 'if' statement we should ask ourselves if we shouldn't be using an OO concept instead of writing more procedural code.

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1  
+1 for procedural code vs object-oriented code –  Phil Oct 6 '11 at 16:09
    
That anti-pattern does have a name, it's called "Functional Decomposition", contrast with "Object Decomposition". –  amoss Oct 11 '11 at 17:31
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It is just a bad code, it does not have a name for it (it doesn't even have an OO design). But the argument could be that the first code does not fallow Open Close Principle. What happens when list of supported things change? You have to rewrite the method you're using.

But the same thing happens when you use the second code snippet. Lets say the supporting rule changes, you'd have to go to the each of the methods and rewrite them. I'd suggest you to have an abstract Support Class and pass different support rules when they change.

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Indeed, and this pattern/anti-pattern depends on context a lot. –  Krom Stern Oct 7 '11 at 9:25
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I don't think it has a name but maybe check the master list at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-pattern knows? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_code probably looks the closer.

I think that your example probably doesn't have a name - whereas your proposed solution does it is called Composite.

http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternComposite.aspx

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Hard code is definitely part of it, which is easily moved to a config file, but that is still something extra that needs to be maintained. How about SoC? –  John Cornell Oct 6 '11 at 7:24
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Since you don't show what the code really is for it's hard to give you a robust sulotion. Here is one that doesn't use any if clauses at all.

// invoked to map different kinds of items to different features
public void BootStrap
{
    featureService.Register(typeof(MyItem), new CustomFeature());
}

// your code without any ifs.
public void ControlStuff()
{
    var listOfThings = LoadThings();
    foreach (var thing in listOfThings)
    {
        thing.InvokeFeatures();
    }
}

// your object
interface IItem
{
    public ICollection<IFeature> Features {get;set;}

    public void InvokeFeatues()
    {
        foreach (var feature in Features)
            feature.Invoke(this);
    }
}

// a feature that can be invoked on an item
interface IFeature
{
    void Invoke(IItem container);
}

// the "glue"
public class FeatureService
{

    void Register(Type itemType, IFeature feature)
    {
        _features.Add(itemType, feature);
    }

    void ApplyFeatures<T>(T item) where T : IItem
    {
        item.Features = _features.FindFor(typof(T));
    }
}
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4  
Either I'm a noob, or this is a little over-engineered. Probably a little bit of both. –  Phil Oct 6 '11 at 13:48
    
Why is it over-engineered? Any kind of solution where if/switch statements are required requires a manual code change in all places where the new features must be supported. This solution doesn't have that problem. –  jgauffin Oct 6 '11 at 13:56
1  
You are right, this would require less code changes in the future. However the structure of it all seems a little complex for what it is trying to achieve and is more difficult to grok. For some scenarios this would be very appropriate, but for most I would lean toward YAGNI. –  Phil Oct 6 '11 at 14:18
1  
As I side note, your word trumps mine - looked at your profile and you have considerably more experience than I do. This is just my first impression. –  Phil Oct 6 '11 at 14:30
1  
Just my 2 cents: I think ease of understanding trumps ease of change in every circumstance that doesn't explicitly require ease of change. IMO, this solution is very convoluted. So I agree with Phil, in it being over-engineered. –  Dunk Oct 6 '11 at 21:56
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I would call it a Failure to Encapsulate. It's a made up term, but it is real and seen quite often

A lot of people forget that encasulation is not just the hiding of data withing an object, it is also the hiding of behavior within that object, or more specifically, the hiding of how the behavior of an object is implemented.

By having an external DoSomething(), which is required for the correct program operation, you create a lot of issues. You cannot reasonably use inheritence in your list of things. If you change the signature of the "thing", in this case the string, the behavior doesn't follow. You need to modify this external class to add it's behaviour (invoking DoSomething() back to the derived thing.

I would offer the "improved" solution, which is to have a list of Thing objects, with a method that implements DoSomething(), which acts as a NOOP for the things that do nothing. This localizes the behavior of the thing within itself, and the maintenance of a special matching list becomes unnecessary.

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If it were one string, I might call it a "magic string". In this case, I would consider "magic string array".

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I don't know if there is a 'pattern' for writing code that is not maintainable or reusable. Why can't you just give them the reason?

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I have, and it was implemented like this regardless. Perhaps this example would help since it difficult to 'See the forest for the trees'. Thanks. –  John Cornell Oct 6 '11 at 7:17
1  
Why vote up? I'd say it is a bad answer, it gives nothing to the question. Explaining why it is not maintainable or reusable would help. Now it just repeats the question saying "it's a bad code", what anyone with at least some OO skills can see. I think it deserves -1 not +1. –  Mykolas Simutis Oct 6 '11 at 7:20
    
The op asked if there was an anti-pattern, and I don't believe there is one for the bit of code above. The op obviously knows why the code is bad code, so why should I have to add that? Instead of complaining about my answer, why don't you provide one or add to the question? –  Cody Oct 6 '11 at 7:27
    
"reference to help in my explanation". So he actually asked why the code is bad. If there is no name for this, it doesn't mean it can not be explained. And I did give my own thoughts how it could be explained to the team. –  Mykolas Simutis Oct 6 '11 at 7:32
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In order to me the best is to explain that in term of computational complexity. Draw two chart showing the number of operation required in term of count(listOfThingsThatSupportX ) and count(listOfThings ) and compare with the solution you propose.

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Instead of using interfaces, you could use attributes. They would probably describe that the object should be 'tagged' as this sort of object, even if tagging it as such doesn't introduce any additional functionality. I.e. an object being described as 'Thing A' doesn't mean that all 'Thing A's have a specific interface, it's just important that they are a 'Thing A'. That seems like the job of attributes more than interfaces.

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