Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In JavaScript, if we write the following for example:

var c = this.checked;

What is checked here? Is it just a state that tells us if a checkbox for example is checked or not? So, can we use it to check that the checkbox is also not checked?

share|improve this question
7  
Try it and see. –  Bojangles Oct 6 '11 at 8:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is it just a state that tells us if a checkbox for example is checked or not? So, can we use it to check that the checkbox is also not checked?

Yes and yes

share|improve this answer

To use the pseudo selector :checked with the jquery object this write:

$(this).is(':checked')
share|improve this answer

Assuming this refers to a DOM element which has a checked property (e.g. a checkbox or a radio button) then the checked property will either be true if the element is checked, or false if it's not. For example, given this HTML:

<input type="checkbox" id="example">

The following line of JS will return false:

var c = document.getElementById("example").checked; //False

Note that what you've written is standard JavaScript, not jQuery. If this refers to a jQuery object rather than a DOM element, checked will be undefined because the jQuery object does not have a checked property. If this is a jQuery object, you can use .prop:

var c = this.prop("checked");
share|improve this answer

In jQuery checked is a selector:

The :checked selector works for checkboxes and radio buttons.

There are some ways to check if a checkbox is checked or not:

For Example:

$('#checkBox').attr('checked'); 

or 

$('#checkBox').is(':checked'); 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.