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I am currently doing some exercises with templated functions. I had the task to write a implementation of the transform algorithm. I did it like the following and it works:

template <class in, class out, class T>
out stransform(in b, in e, out d, T p(const T&)) {
    while (b != e) 
        *d++ = p(*b++);
    return d;
}

As with the normal transform I have to call the predicate with an explicit type like

stransform(begin(vec1), end(vec1), back_inserter(vec2), predi<double>);

Now, I stumbled upon the C++11 Lambdas and wanted to call my function like this:

stransform(begin(vec1), end(vec1), back_inserter(vec2), [] (double x) ->double {return x * 10;} );

With that I do get a compiler error that the type cant be deduced. This is the thing I dont understand as I am defining the T type in my lambda actually twice.

I did also check back the original transform function, with which it is working. I then checked the implementation of that one and it is obviously implemented with a template class for the whole function. Is that the correct way for implementing predicates with templates?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The predicate is normally a simple template argument:

template <class in, class out, class UnaryPredicate>
out stransform(in b, in e, out d, UnaryPredicate p); 

This will accept pointers to function, lambdas and function objects.

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5  
@bamboon I guess because a lambda is no function but a function object, as it may also hold state (it's a closure and not just a function). –  Christian Rau Oct 6 '11 at 9:34
1  
Note that a lambda which does not perform any capturing is convertible to an ordinary function (pointer). –  spraff Oct 6 '11 at 9:37
1  
@spraff: but that conversion is not implemented in MSVC2010, so depending on your compiler, it may not work. (what's more, the conversion is unnecessary and potentially inefficient) –  jalf Oct 6 '11 at 9:50
1  
So the type of the lambda is a class which is implicitly convertible to a function pointer? Such an implicit conversion wouldn't be considered in type deduction anyway. –  visitor Oct 6 '11 at 10:00
6  
@visitor: The type of a lambda is an unknown class type that implements operator() for the defined parameters and returning the same return type. In the particular case of a lambda that does not capture anything (and only then) it is convertible to a function pointer with the same signature, but only if the lambda does not capture anything at all. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 6 '11 at 10:19

T p(const T&) is the type of a function which takes a T by reference. Your lambda takes its argument by value.

stransform (
    begin (vec1),
    end (vec1),
    back_inserter (vec2),
    [] (const double & x) -> double {
        return x * 10;
    });

This should work. A lambda which does not perform any capturing is convertible to an ordinary function.

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1  
but why rely on an unnecessary conversion to function pointer, when you could just redefine the functor to work with functors as well as function pointers? –  jalf Oct 6 '11 at 9:51
    
doesnt work for me(using msvc2011), either. –  bamboon Oct 6 '11 at 10:01
    
@jalf Redefining the functor is a better solution, I agree. If this problem arose with immutable library code then conversion can work. –  spraff Oct 6 '11 at 10:07
2  
@spraff: Even if the type is convertible, by using it in a template, the compiler must deduce the T, and at that stage I don't think that it can apply any conversions (unless the type of the lambda is a function itself, not a functor, in the case where there are no captures). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 6 '11 at 10:22

it is obviously implemented with a template class for the whole function

Slight aside for proper terminology: std::transform is a function template, not a function. More importantly, in a declaration of the style

template<class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, class Functor>
OutputIterator
transform(InputIterator begin, InputIterator end, OutputIterator out, Functor f);

the template parameters InputIterator, OutputIterator and Functor are not required to be class types. Consider this example:

// function declaration
int increment(int);

int array[] = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 };
transform(std::begin(array), std::end(array), std::begin(array), increment);

Then InputIterator and OutputIterator are deduced to be int* and Functor is int(*)(int), none of which is a class type -- much less a template class, but I digress. And in fact, transform could just as well be declared

template<typename InputIterator, typename OutputIterator, typename Functor>
OutputIterator
transform(InputIterator begin, InputIterator end, OutputIterator out, Functor f);

where the keyword typename is a bit more clear on the nature of the template parameters: they're types, of any nature.

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