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How can I drop all the default constraints belonging to a particular table in SQL 2005?

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I have deleted my answer since I'm not 100% sure and i am not able to test. – Peter Apr 20 '09 at 7:52
    
Your own solution seems ok thouh, no? – Peter Apr 20 '09 at 7:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

One solution from a search: (Edited for Default constraints)

SET NOCOUNT ON

DECLARE  @constraintname SYSNAME, @objectid int,
           @sqlcmd         VARCHAR(1024)

DECLARE CONSTRAINTSCURSOR CURSOR  FOR
SELECT NAME, object_id
FROM   SYS.OBJECTS
WHERE  TYPE = 'D' AND @objectid = OBJECT_ID('Mytable')

OPEN CONSTRAINTSCURSOR

FETCH NEXT FROM CONSTRAINTSCURSOR
INTO @constraintname, @objectid

WHILE (@@FETCH_STATUS = 0)
BEGIN
    SELECT @sqlcmd = 'ALTER TABLE ' + OBJECT_NAME(@objectid) + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + @constraintname
    EXEC( @sqlcmd)
    FETCH NEXT FROM CONSTRAINTSCURSOR
    INTO @constraintname, @objectid
END

CLOSE CONSTRAINTSCURSOR
DEALLOCATE CONSTRAINTSCURSOR
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changing OBJECT_NAME to PARENT_OBJECT_NAME worked well thanx. – Vinay Pandey Apr 22 '09 at 8:24
    
Good query. I would make a correction though. The declaration of the cursor should be: SELECT NAME, parent_object_id FROM SYS.OBJECTS WHERE TYPE = 'D' AND parent_object_id = OBJECT_ID('Mytable') – Ioana Marcu Apr 10 '13 at 8:50

I know this is old, but I just found it when googling. A solution that works for me in SQL 2008 (not sure about 2005) without resorting to cursors is below :

declare @sql nvarchar(max)

set @sql = ''

select @sql = @sql + 'alter table YourTable drop constraint ' + name  + ';'
from sys.default_constraints 
where parent_object_id = object_id('YourTable')
AND type = 'D'

exec sp_executesql @sql
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This only deletes the first found constraint (at least that's what it did to me). You have to iterate through all of them. – Ioana Marcu Apr 10 '13 at 8:23
    
@Ioana Marcu: Works for me on a SQL 2008 database. I get a string similar to below for the table called 'Account' alter table Account drop constraint DF__Account__Account__4865BE2A;alter table Account drop constraint DF__Account__Account__4959E263 i.e. a bunch of concatenated drop statements – PabloInNZ Apr 10 '13 at 20:26

Just why do you want to do this? Dropping constraints is a pretty drastic action and affects all users not just your process. Maybe your problem can be solved some other way. If you aren't the dba of the system, you should think very hard about whether you should do this. (Of course in most systems, a dba wouldn't allow anyone else the permissions to do such a thing.)

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2  
I am using Several fields that need to support Unicode and I dont find any other way of doing this. therefore I am changing the datatype of the columns and in process droping the constraints and creating them again....... – Vinay Pandey Apr 21 '09 at 11:04

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