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Is it possible to create a table (from a JPA annotated hibernate entity) that does not contain a primary key / Id?

(I know this is not a good idea. A table should have a primay key.)

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You could create a surrogate key that is auto inserted from Sequence (or equivalent if you are not using Oracle). For old data you could populate the newly created key with running numbers. –  Rosdi Kasim Sep 29 '11 at 7:52
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I found that its not possible to do so. So bad luck for those working with legacy systems.

If you reverse engineer (create JPA annotated entities from existing JDBC connection) the table will create two Java classes, one Entity and with one field; id, and one embeddable id containing all the columns from your relation.

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Really? What about @awied's solution below? It WFM. –  javamonkey79 Nov 12 '10 at 1:00
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Use following code; Hibernate doesn't have its own logic to distinguish duplicate records

Let me know if there are any issues with this approach

@Entity @IdClass(Foo.class)
class Foo implements Serializable {
  @Id private String bar;
  @Id private String bat;

  public String getBar() {
   return bar;    
  }

  public void setBar(String bar) {
   this.bar = bar;
  }


  public String getBat() {
   return bat;    
  }

  public void setBat(String bat) {
   this.bat = bat;    
  }
}
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This is THE best answer. It uses itself as the ID class w/o having to do two separate classes. I moved the Id annotations to my getters since they had the needed Column mappings. It's working perfect and it doesnt break caching. +1 –  John Strickler May 4 '12 at 18:45
1  
@JohnStrickler: is there any drawback of this approach? It looks more like a hack –  Hoàng Long Oct 2 '12 at 8:53
    
So far I've found none. You only need to annotate the properties that are unique (which could be all of them if none are unique). I wouldn't classify it as a hack - it's using JPA annotations the way they were meant to be used. –  John Strickler Oct 2 '12 at 14:41
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You don't need to create a separate class to be your @Id or Primary Key. Just use an Integer (or whatever). Also, don't publish the fake key as developers who use it might think it's real and otherwise try to use it. Lastly, this is best used in a VIEW. I agree with earlier posts that in most, if not all cases, tables should have a primary key. For example:

@Entity
@Table(name = "FOO")
class Foo {

  @SuppressWarnings("unused")
  @Id
  private Integer id;

  @Column(name = "REAL_COLUMN")
  private String realColumn;

  public String getRealColumn() {
    return realColumn;    
  }

  public void setRealColumn(String realColumn) {
    this.realColumn= realColumn;    
  }


}
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1  
This does not work. Got some column not found error after adding this. –  Jeremy Aug 12 '11 at 8:52
    
This does work. You have to do it on a view. Also, of course, change the members to columns of your database. If you used "realColumn", well of course it won't work. I've used this approach in a real system. –  Domenic D. Dec 6 '11 at 2:18
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Roger's self-answer is correct. To elaborate a bit on what is meant (I wasn't clear on it at first and figured this would help):

Say you have you have a table Foo as such:

TABLE Foo (
bar varchar(20),
bat varchar(20)
)

Normally, you can write a class w/Annotations to work with this table:

// Technically, for this example, the @Table and @Column annotations 
// are not needed, but don't hurt. Use them if your column names 
// are different than the variable names.

@Entity
@Table(name = "FOO")
class Foo {

  private String bar;
  private String bat;


  @Column(name = "bar")
  public String getBar() {
   return bar;    
  }

  public void setBar(String bar) {
   this.bar = bar;    
  }

  @Column(name = "bat")
  public String getBat() {
   return bat;    
  }

  public void setBat(String bat) {
   this.bat = bat;    
  }

}

.. But, darn. This table has nothing we can use as an id, and it's a legacy database that we use for [insert vital business function]. I don't think they'll let me start modifying tables in order for me to use hibernate.

You can, instead, split the object up into a hibernate-workable structure which allows the entire row to be used as the key. (Naturally, this assumes that the row is unique.)

Split the Foo object into two thusly:

@Entity
@Table(name = "FOO")
class Foo {

  @Id
  private FooKey id;

  public void setId(FooKey id) {
    this.id = id;
  }

  public void getId() {
    return id;
  }
}

and

@Embeddable
class FooKey implements Serializable {
  private String bar;
  private String bat;

  @Column(name = "bar")
  public String getBar() {
   return bar;    
  }

  public void setBar(String bar) {
   this.bar = bar;    
  }

  @Column(name = "bat")
  public String getBat() {
   return bat;    
  }

  public void setBat(String bat) {
   this.bat = bat;    
  }

}

.. And that should be it. Hibernate will use the Embeddable key for its required identity and you can make a call as normal:

Query fooQuery = getSession().createQuery("from Foo");

Hope this helps first-timers with getting this working.

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3  
I wanted to mention, because I just had this problem, that if any of those columns you are using for your composite key are NULL, than Hibernate will return null objects. I was pulling everything from a View and one of the columns was all null so hibernate was returning a list with the right number of items in it, but all the items were null. In my case I couldn't modify the field, so I just removed it from the Key. –  Casey Nov 23 '10 at 16:25
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