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This program recursively calls the function tester.

#include <iostream>
 void tester();
 int i = 1;
 int k = 1;

 int main() {
   tester();
 }

 void tester() {
  while(i++ < 10)
    tester();
  std::cout << "called " << k++ << " times" << std::endl;
 }

I am surprised by this output :

called 1 times
called 2 times
called 3 times
called 4 times
called 5 times
called 6 times
called 7 times
called 8 times
called 9 times
called 10 times

and it is because this is the way i understand this program :

After the first call to tester from main it enters a loop. The first statement of the loop calls the function tester again, and this carries on.After looping 10 times the statement following the while loop should work i.e only once . So the output should be :called 1 times . But this isn't actually happening ! Why ? How does this program work ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The while body is executed only once in each recursive depth. The while is false when i is 10, which will be when tester () is called 10 times recursively. As the i is declared global, the i++ update will be visible to each call of tester ().

At the last recursive depth when the while condition is false, the last tester () call will return to its previous depth. At this moment, the next iteration of the while loop will be false as i is 10. The cout statement will be encountered after each while loop is terminated, which will sequentially print the values of k, incrementing at each recursive depth, as the recursion rolls back.

Manually trace what happens to understand the stuff.

UPDATE

Have a look at the execution output. Especially note the d parameter, which denotes the recursive depth. At each depth the while loop has iterated one time, upto the last "while is true, tester called" output. At depth 10, the while is false as it is 10, and first time it returns back the control to its previous depth level, (the first "return back" when i is 10). After it returns the control returns to the body of the while loop of the last level, from which the function was called (from which it just returned), and the next iteration of this loop will be false, (i is global and 10 or more), therefore this also returns. Similarly, at each recursive depth the 2nd iteration of while loop is false, and it keeps returning. Check out the output.

i   k  d
 1  1  0, call from main
 2  1  1, while is true, tester called
 3  1  2, while is true, tester called
 4  1  3, while is true, tester called
 5  1  4, while is true, tester called
 6  1  5, while is true, tester called
 7  1  6, while is true, tester called
 8  1  7, while is true, tester called
 9  1  8, while is true, tester called
10  1  9, while is true, tester called
11  1 10, returning back, print k    // this step the while is false in depth 10
12  2  9, returning back, print k    // from now on, as the recursion rolls back
13  3  8, returning back, print k    // the second iteration at each recursive 
14  4  7, returning back, print k    // depth will be executed, and each while
15  5  6, returning back, print k    // condition will be false, therefore it will
16  6  5, returning back, print k    // not call tester anymore and return the control
17  7  4, returning back, print k    // to the previous level. NOICE the `d' parameter
18  8  3, returning back, print k
19  9  2, returning back, print k
20 10  1, returning back, print k

And here is the test code. I hope the description is much clear now (?). Analyzing this will help.

#include <stdio.h>

int i = 1;
int k = 1;

void tester (int d)
{
  while (i++ < 10)
  {
    printf ("%2d %2d %2d, while is true, tester called\n", i, k, d);
    tester (d+1);
  }
  printf ("%2d %2d %2d, returning back, print k\n", i, k++, d);
}

int main (void)
{
  int depth = 0;
  printf ("i   k  d\n");
  printf ("%2d %2d %2d, call from main\n", i, k, depth);
  tester (depth + 1);

  return 0;
}
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1  
your answer confuses me ! I could hardly understand what you tried to explain –  program-o-steve Oct 6 '11 at 11:56

tester is executed ten times so of cource std::cout is used ten times as well.

The print order is actually reversed to the call order since the last call of tester returns first because of the recursion.

EDIT: Try this code, maybe it helps you understand (sorry, it's not very pretty, just quick hack):

#include <iostream>
void tester();
void print_indent(int cnt);
int i = 1;
int k = 1;
int recursion_level = 0;
int call_num = 0;

int main() {
    tester();
}

void tester() {
    int my_call = call_num++;
    print_indent(recursion_level);
    std::cout << "start of tester " << my_call << std::endl;
    recursion_level++;
    while(i++ < 10)
        tester();
    print_indent(recursion_level);
    std::cout << "called " << k++ << " times" << std::endl;
    recursion_level--;
    print_indent(recursion_level);
    std::cout << "end of tester " << my_call << std::endl;
}

void print_indent(int cnt) {
    for (int i = 0; i < cnt; i++)
        std::cout << "  ";
}
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Once a recursive call is started the current function freezes until that call returns. So your function first does the recursive call, then prints.

So the first print will occur in the function called latest. Once that latest called function prints and returns all prior calls will start printing and returning until the earliest called function exits.

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if i print i along with the statement called...times the value of i goes from 11 to 20. why is that ? why does i keep incrementing it self ? And tell clearly what do you mean by the current function freezes until that call returns . Please elaborate this in your answer –  Suhail Gupta Oct 6 '11 at 12:35
    
That happens because in each recursive call to tester() you are testing the loop invariant to check that it is less than 10. On each successful test you recursively call tester() once more. However, the loop invariant still needs to be tested once more within each recursive call to test whether or not the invariant still holds. Because you are incrementing the variable i within the loop condition you end up incrementing the value a total of 20 times, the first set of 10 in each recursive call, the second set of 10 in each test to confirm that the invariant no longer holds. –  Munro Oct 6 '11 at 13:27
    
To see this in action without the recursive step simply comment out your call to tester() and you will find that you will get the output "called 11 times" when outputting the value i. –  Munro Oct 6 '11 at 13:33

That's the essence of recursion. When tester() calls itself, it builds up a stack of calls, and then prints the message as each function returns. Each time that tester returns, it prints the message, which will happen 10 times because of the while loop. I visualize it like this:

i    k    
---  ---  ---
 1    1  + tester()
 2    1  |   + tester()
 3    1  |   |   + tester()
 4    1  |   |   |   + tester()
 5    1  |   |   |   |   + tester()
 6    1  |   |   |   |   |   + tester()
 7    1  |   |   |   |   |   |   + tester()
 8    1  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   + tester()
 9    1  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   + tester()
10    1  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   + tester()
11    1  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   + "called 1 times"
12    2  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   + "called "2" times"
13    3  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   + "called 3 times"
14    4  |   |   |   |   |   |   + "called 4 times"
15    5  |   |   |   |   |   + "called 5 times"
16    6  |   |   |   |   + "called 6 times"
17    7  |   |   |   + "called 7 times"
18    8  |   |   + "called 8 times"
19    9  |   + "called 9 times"
20   10  + "called 10 times"
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what does the matching of 1st call to tester with "called 10 times" using vertical line denote ? what do you mean by it ? –  Suhail Gupta Oct 6 '11 at 12:11
1  
-1: the value of i goes till 20 –  program-o-steve Oct 6 '11 at 12:16
    
Yes, it does go to 20 because of the ++ in the while loop test. Edited to fix. –  Bob Lied Oct 7 '11 at 10:46
    
The vertical lines are intended to show where the first line in tester() is reached, matched to where the last line of tester is reached. –  Bob Lied Oct 7 '11 at 10:51

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